Tag Archives: aviation

Not paying your pilots can be deadly

“Human Factors” statistically has contributed to more than 70% of all commercial aviation hull loss accidents. Initially human factors were considered strictly a flight operations issue, which is now classified as “Pilot Error”, but now include the aircraft maintenance, air traffic control operations and few other areas. You can read more about Human Factors on the wiki.

Airlines based in India

In simpler words, more accidents have happened, where the technology was not at fault, and it was a human error, where incorrect decisions were made. FAA implemented the Crew Resource management (CRM) and Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) programs to counteract human errors. There are many external sources that can and do affect a pilot’s judgment skills and abilities. Many have been identified by the FAA and have been incorporated in the training of the pilots.

Illness, Medications, Stress, Alcohol, Fatigue, Emotions (IM SAFE checklist) are some of the culprits interfering with a good Aeronautical Decision Making process (ADM). I’d like to talk more about Stress here. Many things can cause stress; NOT GETTING PAID at your JOB definitely is STRESSFULL. This is the current situation with many airlines in India, including the state owned Air India!! Many pilots have not received a pay check in months!

Can we look at this simply as a labor code violation, or do you think this can be an accident waiting to happen? Flying an airliner thinking about how you are going to provide for your family? Would you like to be a passenger in one of these airlines, where the pilots have not received their paychecks in months? Probably not. How would you like these airlines to operate in our airspace?

What’s even more disturbing is FAA’s category 1 aviation safety rating for these airlines. FAA does not consider “not paying your pilots” as a threat to safety.

Since 1992 FAA implements a program called International Aviation Safety Assessment (IASA) and grades countries based on aviation safety rating, and India happens to have category 1 rating, which allows their airlines to fly in and out of our airspace freely. Obviously IASA’s category 1 rating, meaning, India’s oversight of it’s airlines (including the one owned by itself) meets the ICAO standards, and not paying it’s pilots in months is not a safety oversight!!

James – working on getting his CFI for FREE!

Free Flight Training

Free Flight Training

I have written posts here about how to pay for your flight training in the absence of student loans and government grants. James is a commercial pilot and has been trying to get a student loan to pay for his CFI, CFII and MEI. He picked his school – CFI Academy in Sacramento. He has exhausted all the venues of getting some bank or the government to help him pay for his flight instructor training, but with no success. He read this blog, contacted me, and he has been with us since a month now.

I decided I should post about his journey with us – earning money to pay for flight training. So far he is doing good. He has completed the job training and since last week he is on the job, earning and saving. His goal is to make and save $12,000 so he can pay for all 3 flight instructor ratings and multi-engine add on on his commercial pilot.I’ll keep posting here, about his success story. Maybe on a bi-weekly basis.

How to pay for your flight training?

Ever since the US economy went haywire in mid 2008, it has been almost impossible for most us here in the US to obtain a student loan to pay for the flight training. It used to be much easier before. There were various options available to most; like the Sallie Mae, US Bank, Bank of America. Most banks would finance professional pilot training against the applicant’s credit.

Flight Training Loan

Flight Training Funding

Since 2008, things have changed a lot. Now one may walk in with an excellent credit, but still no student loans. Banks look at the borrower’s ability to repay the loan back in a new light. Not only credit, but job availability and potential future income are considered as well.

No bank loan means no chance at being able to afford flight training? It should not be like this. And really, its not. Back in the days, in 80’s when we trained, there were really no bank loans around. We would simply save up money by working various jobs and then go and spend it at a flight school. In my case, it took me 4 years to go from student pilot to Flight Instructor. This was the downside. The upside was that I walked away as a CFI with no student loan to pay off over the next 15 years.

During my career as a flight instructor, I have trained many others in my shoes. Most are airline pilots now. And many had odd jobs to earn the money for their training.

What if I show you how you can earn the money and pay for your flight training cash, and be a Commercial Pilot within a year’s time? And no student loan needed. Would this get your interest?

I want to be That Guy

This blog is about General Aviation and Flight Training. So far I have been writing about flying lessons in an airplane, as this is what I have been involved in as a professional pilot and flight instructor. Even though before I got into airplanes, I used to fly gliders. And during my own flight training I got me an opportunity to sky dive, which was a total blast!

As a matter of fact, a few weeks ago I decided to drive down to the Lodi, CA airport, which is right off highway 99, and got some information on taking some professional sky diving lessons. I was hoping to be able to do this before I get back to working full time again. And today, a friend and a former student Christophe (from France) sent me a link to this cool Hang Glider pilot’s video on YouTube, and now I am thinking….:-)

I want to be that Guy – Nicholas Cage

New Charter Pilot Jobs in India

A new company in India is launching the country’s first small piston engine airplane on demand air-charter service, starting with a fleet of two Cirrus SR22 aircraft. Manav Singh, the Chairman of Air Car (and Club One Air) states that the seats are expected to be priced competitively with business-class airline tickets and half the price of competition’s air-charter options. The company will fly out of Delhi and serve destinations within a 300 mile radius, including several emerging cities that lack airline service. “Air Car offers the option to travel faster to these places at reasonable rates,” said Uttam Kumar Bose, former CEO of Air Sahara, and a partner in Air Car.

Air Car has 10 SR-22s on order per Mr. U.K. Bose. The company plans to add 2-3 airplanes each quarter and expand nationwide over the next 5 years. The company is also working to offer package deals to corporate clients.

“We will fly to short distances and the price to charter a plane would be as low as an executive class ticket in a full service carrier between Delhi-Chandigarh, which is about Rs. 10,000 one way” Manav Singh, chairman Air Car said.

Managing director of the company Mr. Uttam Kumar Bose said, “In India, only 200 people can afford to charter a plane in a year. We want to change that and provide low-cost options and in the next 2 years we are looking at 20,000 passengers.

So what does all this mean to unemployed DGCA CPL holders in India? New pilot jobs! If Air Car is planning to add 2-3 aircraft per quarter over the next 5 years, that equates to 8-15 new aircraft per year or about 50 aircraft over the next 5 years. Each aircraft usually should have a crew of 4 pilots each (small aircraft, charter on demand type flight operations), and that means 200 new pilot positions over a period of 5 years.

And I don’t think Air Car is going to be strictly SR-22 either. I am sure they are going to add various other smaller piston and jet aircraft to serve India’s short distance charter on demand market. Also, others are definitely going to join in to compete for the same market.

If you are a CPL holder in India, this should be a good news for you.

Top 20 Career Options as a Pilot

When we think of pilots, most of us get an image of an airline pilot in our heads. Well, it is true that airline pilot career is one of the most glamorous and top choice career option for most professional pilots, but many chose to join one of the many other options available to them, and many do very well in those fields. Here are the few other career options as a pilot:

  1. Airline Pilots – fly for the airline industry worldwide, both major and regional airline carriers.
  2. Corporate Pilots – fly the high end, newer corporate airplanes for the rich and wealthy.
  3. Military Pilots – fly the state of the art, top of the line, military aircraft, and learn to fly for free (well, get paid0.
  4. Cargo Pilots – fly for the big and small cargo airlines, and cargo carriers, like FedEx, UPS etc.
  5. Air Taxi and Charter Pilots – fly for growing line of air taxi and charter operators worldwide.
  6. Ferry Pilots – fly as a ferry pilot for aircraft manufacturers like Boeing, Airbus, and then there are a lot of aircraft ferry companies available too, to go deliver the aircraft to it’s new owners.
  7. Patrol Pilots – fly for a news group to report traffic, police chases etc, or fly for aerial surveillance companies, like pipeline patrols, oil well patrols etc.
  8. Flight Instructor Pilots – a career option of choice for someone like me. Teach others how to fly, and get paid for it.
  9. EMR Pilots – fly for the air ambulance operators (big and small), helicopters and airplanes.
  10. Law Enforcement Pilots – most law enforcement agencies now have an aviation wing. And a lot of them hire pilots to fly their aircraft.
  11. Aerial Firefighter Pilots – this is mostly a contract and seasonal job, but you may want to combine this with some other job, like a full time firefighter job, or a military reserve pilot job, or a flight instructor job, then you can have the best of all the worlds.
  12. Aerial Crop-duster Pilots – similar line of work like #11 above, but you spray agricultural chemicals for the ag industry, and sometimes even for the local government bodies (pest control etc).
  13. Helicopter Pilots – a whole complete bag of choices, like, military, offshore oil industry, law enforcement, border patrol, DEA, Customs etc. Maybe even the mafia and drug lords. No, the last one was a joke!
  14. Astronauts – space travel in not limited to NASA guys only anymore. Civilian spacecraft are in the near future (well, they already are) going to be affordable to common people, and you can fly those cool high tech vehicles back and forth from earth to space all day long. Something to really think about.
  15. Test Pilots – fly for various aircraft manufacturers, both transport and general aviation, and thousands of other companies, training centers etc as a test pilot.
  16. Airshow Aerobatic Pilots – read my posts about Sean Tucker by clicking here and here (with videos), and you will get an idea. There are many like him who do this full time and part time.
  17. Aircraft Salesmen Pilots – many aircraft sales businesses, including general aviation aircraft manufacturers hire pilots to work as sales-people so they can go and demo the aircraft to prospective customers.
  18. Federal Government Pilots – probably one of the largest employer of pilots. In addition to all of the above, consider flying for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DEA, Customs, Border Patrol, Air National Guard, and many other agencies, even overseas deployment possibilities.
  19. Contract Pilots – fly for government contracting corporations like dyncorp etc, and you can pick and chose just about everything in your pilot career.
  20. Aviation Universities and College Pilots – many aviation educational institutes like Embry Riddle (ERAU), Daniel Websters etc hire pilots and flight instructors to teach in their aviation degree programs.

I wanted to make this list of 20 pilots today. Trust me, I can add many other pilot career options to this list right now, but it’s getting late and I need to go take care of personal stuff. When you are a pilot, sky is not the limit for you anymore!

Amazing NTSB (Animation) US Airways Airbus Crash Ditching in Hudson

NTSB’s investigation hearings of the Jan 15th, 2009 US Airways’ Airbus Flight 1549 bird-strike incident which led to the ditching of the aircraft in Hudson river have generated some potential recommendations – developing an on-aircraft anti-bird technology for rounding-up and wiping-out thousands of Canada Geese. At the hearings, Airbus test pilots supported Captain Sullenberger’s decision; to ditch the aircraft in the river instead of trying to make LaGuardia or Teterboro airports.

Airbus’ fly by wire system was commended for allowing Capt. Sullenberger to maintain the best airspeed for the ditching simply by holding the joystick in full aft position and letting the computers do the the rest; not letting the aircraft stall while he simply maintained the wings level.The hearings also reviewed and made public a rather compelling NTSB video animation with overlay-ed ATC audio and CVR content (textual). A board member’s call for more research into onboard bird-repellant or bird-deterrent technologies is supported by at least one study, conducted by Qantas and Precise Flight, which concluded that aircraft equipped with pulsed landing light system resulted in fewer bird strikes.

2004 Tests conducted by the U.S. Agriculture Department were less definitive; but further research (specifically, into flash frequency and light wavelengths) may be recommended by the NTSB.

101 General Aviation and Flight Training Scholarships

Since I have been thinking about compiling a complete list of all scholarship programs available for aviation training, I am posting here the interim list that I have prepared already. And, if you know of a program that is not mentioned in my post, please leave me a comment so I can add it. Also, on another post I have posted the Federal Aid for Flight Training available for certain qualifying candidates and training programs.

  1. American Historical Association – Fellowship in aerospace history. The American Historical Association will annually fund at least one Fellow, for one academic year, to undertake a research project related to aerospace history.
  2. Astronaut Scholarship Foundation – Scholarships in science and engineering. The Astronaut Scholarship Foundation was created to ensure that the United States would maintain its leadership in science and technology by supporting promising students in science and engineering.
  3. ATCA Scholarships Program – Air Traffic Control Association. Air Traffic Control Association (ATCA) Scholarships are awarded to help support the financial needs of those deserving students who have chosen to seek higher education in the science of air traffic control and other aviation disciplines, as well as children of air traffic control specialists.
  4. Aviation Scholarship Foundation – Flight training scholarships for teens in Illinois and Indiana. Discontinued in 2007.
  5. Aviation scholarships – Louisiana Tech listing of aviation scholarships, some specifically for African-Americans.There are a number of scholarships available to aviation students. Because of the frequent changes in the scholarship offerings, it is best to check with the Professional Aviation office regarding the current availability.
  6. Texas Space Grant Consortium – Scholarships and fellowships for students attending TSGC institutions. All graduate and undergraduate students that are attending TSGC academic institutions are eligible to apply.
  7. Aerospace Education Foundation (AEF) – AEF provides 800 scholarships and grants to flight students and educators. Special attention given to military applicants.
  8. Aircraft Electronics Association Educational Foundation – The AEAEF offers (27) scholarships totaling over $66,000 to graduating high school seniors and enrolled college students, seeking degrees in the field of aviation maintenance, avionics, and aircraft repair.
  9. Air Force Aid Society’s Education Grant – The Air Force Aid Society provides $1,500 grants to dependent children of active, retired, or deceased members of the Air Force Aid Society. In addition, the grants require financial need and full-time student status.
  10. AOPA – The Airline Pilots Association offers a four-year renewable $3,000 scholarship to students who are children of medically retired or deceased pilot members of the Airline Pilots Association. The executive committee will also consider freshman college students; high school seniors should apply during the second semester of their senior year.
  11. Airports Council International – North America Commissioner’s Roundtable Scholarship – The ACI-NA offers five annual scholarships up to $2,000 for enrolled undergraduates seeking a career in airport management. Must have a 3.0 GPA.
  12. Air Traffic Control Association – ATCA offers $600-$2,500 awards to promising students in an aviation related degree program. Successful candidates will have scholastic achievement, financial need, and the drive to succeed in the aviation industry.
  13. American Association of Airport Executives – The AAAE Foundation scholarship will grant $1,000 each year to a number of students with a junior or senior class standing, who are enrolled in an aviation management program. Applicants should have a GPA of 3.0 or higher and financial need.
  14. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics – The AIAA offers an award of $2000 to sophomore and higher Engineering students with a 3.0 GPA.
  15. AOPA Air Safety Foundation -The Air Safety foundation sponsors one $1,000 scholarship for both the McAlester Memorial and Donald Burnside Memorial Scholarships. Students must have junior or senior standing at the time of application, a 3.25 GPA, and be enrolled in a non-engineering degree program.
  16. Aviation / Aerospace Education Foundation – Bessie Coleman Scholarship to entering first-year students, Eugene Bullard scholarship to upper-class students. Both offer cash scholarships of $1,000 to students pursuing a degree in aviation or aviation-related field.
  17. Aviation Distributors and Manufacturers Association Scholarships – ADMA offers two $1,000 scholarships to students of the professional pilot program enrolled in either an aviation maintenance or aviation management program. Applicants must be a third- or fourth-year student in their program, and selections are based on scholastic achievement, and the content of their application package.
  18. Aviation Scholarship Foundation – The Aviation Scholarship Foundation funds a full course of private pilot training, start to finish, for half a dozen inner city youth from Chicago in gliders and airplanes each year. Scholarships are awarded annually each April with an April 15th deadline.
  19. Experimental Aircraft Association Foundation – The EAA Offers a variety of awards and scholarships ranging from $200 to full tuition (including books and equipment). Awarded to students seeking careers in aviation. International students may apply. There is a $5.00 application fee.
  20. Festival of Wings Over Houston – The Festival of Wings over Houston offers several scholarships up to the sum of $5,000. Must be a full-time status junior with a 3.0 GPA.
  21. Hispanic Scholarship Fund -The Hispanic Scholarship Fund (HSF) is the largest Hispanic scholarship-granting organization in the nation. HSF offers different scholarship programs for students of various educational backgrounds. All applicants must be U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents of Hispanic heritage.
  22. National Business Aircraft Association -NBAA offers (2) $2,500 scholarships and (3) $1,500 scholarships to students who are at least in a sophomore, junior, or senior class standing.
  23. National Gay Pilots Association – The NGPA offers a $2,000 scholarship, however, it cannot be used to pay for the training needed for a Private Pilot License. Must be 18 or older and majoring in engineering, or airport management.
  24. NIFA and GAMA Harold Wood ScholarshipOne scholarship is offered to students in any degree program, having completed at least one semester, and having a 3.0 GPA or better.
  25. National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship – NSF Fellowships are available to U.S. citizens entering graduate study in engineering. The fellowship includes a $15,000 stipend. Special programs are available for women and minorities.
  26. Northeast Chapter – American Association of Airport Executives – AAAE offers (4) $1,000 scholarships for undergraduate juniors and seniors enrolled in aviation management, with preference given to residents of the Northeast region.
  27. Professional Aviation maintenance Association – PAMA will award more than $30,000 in scholarships. Individual recipients of $1,000 scholarships are selected on the basis of educational performance, work experience, participation in school and community activities, career commitment, future potential, and financial need.
  28. Rockwell Collins – Dallas Female and Minority Scholarship – Rockwell Collins offers a $4,000 scholarship to a female or minority engineering student. Must have a 3.0 GPA, be full-time, and have completed at least one year or more in Electrical Engineering or Computer Science.
  29. Society of Women Engineers – SWE offers several scholarships to female and minority students enrolled in an engineering, aerospace or computer science programs. The class standing varies depending on the specific scholarship, but ranges from incoming freshmen to junior class standing. The amounts range from $1,000 to $5,000. One application is for all grade levels.
  30. Transportation Clubs International – Transportation Clubs International offers several scholarships to students enrolled in a transportation-related degree program.
  31. University Aviation Association – UAA offers an annual $500 scholarship. Must have a 3.0 GPA, and be a UAA member.Below is the list of scholarships offered through Women in Aviation International. Click on the link and you will see all of these scholarship details on that page.
  32. Aircraft Dispatcher Course – Airline Ground Schools, Inc. Airline Ground Schools (AGS) will award one dispatcher training award leading to an FAA Aircraft Dispatcher certificate.
  33. Aircraft Dispatcher Course – Airline Dispatcher Federation (ADF) Scholarship. ADF will award one dispatcher scholarship donated by Airline Ground Schools, Inc. leading to a FAA Aircraft Dispatcher certificate.
  34. Aerospace Engineering Scholarship – American Airlines and American Eagle Engineering Scholarship. American Airlines and American Eagle will award one $5,000 scholarship to a student pursuing a degree in the field of engineering – aerospace/aeronautical, mechanical, or electrical.
  35. Aerospace Engineering Scholarship – Delta Air Lines Engineering Scholarship. Delta Air Lines will award a $5,000 scholarship to a student currently enrolled in a Baccalaureate degree in Aerospace/ Aeronautical, Electrical, or Mechanical Engineering.
  36. Aerospace Engineering Scholarship – WAI Connecticut Chapter Engineering Scholarship. The scholarship will be awarded to a woman who wishes to pursue a career in the aerospace industry in the field of Engineering.
  37. Flight Training Scholarship – Airbus A320 Type Rating Certificate Scholarships (2). Applicants for the Airbus A320 type rating scholarships must hold a bachelor’s degree, commercial pilot certificate, instrument rating, certified flight instructor certificate and multiengine rating.
  38. Flight Training Scholarship – Anne Baddour Scholarship. The Anne Baddour Scholarship will be awarded to a female pilot with the following accomplishments: a burning desire to become a professional pilot, have at least a Private Pilot Certificate, be on track towards the ATP.
  39. Flight Training Scholarship – AOPA Student Pilot Scholarship. As part of its commitment to growing the pilot population, AOPA will award a $3,000 scholarship to a woman pursuing a private, recreational, or sport pilot certificate who has obtained a student pilot certificate.
  40. Flight Training Scholarship – Betsy Goldbach Aviation Scholarship. I love flying and would like to encourage others to explore the wonders of the sky. This scholarship may be used towards a Private Pilot Certificate or a Seaplane Rating.
  41. Flight Training Scholarship – Bombardier Business Aircraft Services Lear 31A Pilot Training Type-Rating Scholarships (2). In memory of Richard E. Blose, Learjet 31A Instructor Pilot, Bombardier Business Aircraft Services is offering two (2) Learjet 31A pilot type-rating scholarships.
  42. Flight Training Scholarship – CAE SimuFlite Citation Corporate Aircraft Training Scholarship. CAE SimuFlite will award a corporate aircraft training scholarship. It will include Citation initial training resulting in a type rating upon successful completion of the course.
  43. Flight Training Scholarship – Continental Airlines 737 Flight Training Scholarships (2). Continental Airlines is offering four Boeing 737NG type rating training scholarships. Criteria requires a minimum of 1,500 hours total time, 1,000 hours turbine, 1,000 hours multi, 1,000 hours PIC.
  44. Dare to Dream Scholarship – The sponsor of this scholarship would like to make a difference in the life of one deserving person who is pursuing her dream in the world of aviation. A $3000 scholarship will be awarded to an individual working toward an instrument or multi-engine rating, commercial or CFI certificate.
  45. Delta Air Lines Boeing B737-800 Type Rating Certificate Scholarships (2) – Delta Air Lines will award two B737-800 Type Rating Certificates to qualified recipients that are currently enrolled or have a Baccalaureate Degree.
  46. Delta Connection Academy Scholarship – Delta Connection Academy is happy to provide one WAI recipient a $5,000 scholarship to Delta Connection Academy.
  47. ExpressJet Airlines, DBA Continental Express, Regional Jet Transition Course – ExpressJet Airlines is offering two scholarships to participate in the initial ground school instruction on the EMBRAER 145 with a FTD session and CRM course; the first step to your path of becoming a First Officer.
  48. The Keep Flying Scholarship 2010 – The Keep Flying Scholarship was created after 9/11 to offer an intermediate level flight scholarship. Sponsors Deborah Hecker, Evelyne Tinkl and Janet Patton are offering one $3,000 scholarship to an individual working on an instrument or multi-engine rating, commercial or CFI rating certificate.
  49. Kathy K. Hodgkins Memorial Scholarship (floatplane training) – Kathy K. Hodgskins was a pioneer in the aviation community in Maine. She not only had an airline career with Continental Airlines, but she also had a successful floatplane operation with her husband, Tim.
  50. Ride The Sun Scholarship – Looking for assistance to extend your horizons and increase your aviation skills? Use this $500 monetary award to help defer the costs for out of the ordinary flight education.
  51. From Rose to Rise Scholarship – This scholarship will be given to someone who has soloed and is working toward a private pilot certificate, and shows a well-rounded aviation interest besides piloting, such as active participation in aviation groups, and demonstrated interest/participation in aviation history, promotion, and/or education.
  52. Sporty’s Foundation Flight Training Scholarship (2) – Sporty’s Foundation is offering Recreational Pilot Flight Training Scholarships (2) for small aircraft maintenance technicians.
  53. Women Military Aviators – Dream of Flight Scholarship 2010 – Women Military Aviators (WMA) seeks to preserve, for history, the important role women have played in creating and supporting the American Spirit through their contributions to flight, aeronautics and space.
  54. Airbus Leadership Grant – One scholarship will be awarded to a student at the college level of sophomore year or above who is pursuing a degree in an aviation-related field, who has achieved a minimum GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) and who has exhibited leadership potential.
  55. The Boeing Company Career Enhancement Scholarship – The Boeing Company will award a scholarship to a woman who wishes to advance her career in the aerospace industry in the fields of engineering, technology development or management.
  56. Dassault Falcon Jet Corporation Scholarship – Dassault Falcon Jet Corp. is awarding a $1000 scholarship to support a woman seeking to pursue an undergraduate or graduate degree in an aviation-related field.
  57. Desert Jet Corporate Aviation Management Scholarship Desert Jet, an aircraft charter and management company based in the Palm Springs area of California, is sponsoring this scholarship to promote the professional development and leadership skills of business aviation pilots who seek careers in aviation management or desire to start their own aviation-related business.
  58. The Elisha Hall Memorial Scholarship – Elisha Hall (Mrs. Mark Bizzaro-WAI #2335) represented herself as a dedicated and passionate aviation professional. She was a leader, an explorer, and lived life to its fullest. She set both her sights, and her standards, high. To celebrate her life and accomplishments, Women in Aviation, The Wright Chapter, is offering a $1,000 scholarship to a woman who embodies the qualities that Elisha so splendidly exemplified, and is seeking to further her aviation career.
  59. If You Can Dream It, You Can Do It” Scholarship – Nicole Cagnolatti, A&P/Pilot has been the recipient of several WAI scholarships and benefited immensely from the assistance. She wants to personally contribute to the WAI Scholarships (for the 3rd year) by offering other aviation dreamers the opportunity to pursue their dream.
  60. Janet Clark Memorial Scholarship – The Washington State Chapter of Women in Aviation, International (WA-WAI) is offering a scholarship in the amount of $1500 in memory of Janet Clark, a member of the Washington State chapter. Janet worked with the FAA as an Airworthiness (maintenance) Aviation Safety Inspector. This scholarship is open to all aviation career fields and can be applied to an accredited program.
  61. PAI Consulting Aviation Safety Scholarship (3) – PAI Consulting, a women-owned aviation consulting firm that provides support to the government and industry, will award three $1,000 scholarships to women pursuing aviation safety studies.
  62. Women in Aviation, International Achievement Award (3). Two scholarship will be awarded to a full-time college or university student pursuing any type of aviation or aviation related career. A third scholarship will be awarded to an individual, not required to be a student, pursuing any type of aviation.
  63. Women in Corporate Aviation Career Scholarship – The Women in Corporate Aviation Career Scholarship is offered by the members and sponsors of Women in Corporate Aviation to any man or woman pursuing professional development or career advancement in any job classification of corporate/business aviation.
  64. Delta Air Lines Aircraft Maintenance Technology Scholarship – Delta Air Lines will award a $5,000 scholarship to a student currently enrolled in an Aviation Maintenance Technician Program (A&P) or a degree in Aviation Maintenance Technology. In addition to the $5,000 scholarship, the recipient will receive a trip to the 21st Annual International Women in Aviation Conference.
  65. Delta Air Lines – Engine Maintenance Internship – Delta Air Lines would like to extend a 2010 Summer Internship (13 weeks) opportunity to a student currently enrolled in a Baccalaureate degree in Aerospace/Aeronautical, Mechanical or Industrial Engineering. In addition to an internship position, the recipient will receive a trip to the 21st Annual International Women in Aviation Conference.
  66. Pratt & Whitney Maintenance Scholarships (6) – Pratt & Whitney will award six maintenance scholarships to individuals pursuing careers in aviation maintenance. Winners will have the option to attend any one of the maintenance courses offered by Pratt & Whitney or Pratt & Whitney Canada.
  67. Flo Irwin / Aircraft Spruce Scholarship – Flo Irwin was not a pilot, but she was a very astute businessperson who earned everyone’s respect in a “man’s world” as she built her business selling homebuilt aircraft parts. Aircraft Spruce has grown to be one of the leading distributors of aircraft parts worldwide by continuing Flo’s vision and business philosophy.
  68. GAT Wings to the Future Management Scholarship – GAT will give a scholarship to a female student in an aviation management or aviation business program at an accredited college or university.
  69. Women in Aviation Management Scholarship – This scholarship will be awarded to a woman in an aviation management field who has exemplified the traits of leadership, community spirit and volunteerism. The scholarship can be used to attend a leadership-related course or seminar to raise the individual’s level of management.
  70. Yeager Foundation WAI Scholarship Award – In 2005 the Chuck Yeager Foundation established a scholarship to assist those who may not otherwise be able to become involved in aviation. This scholarship will be awarded to a deserving WAI member who has applied for other WAI or Corporate Sponsor scholarships and who has unique circumstances that impede their ability to advance their aviation plans.
  71. FedEx Express B-727 Aircraft – FedEx Express is accepting applications from qualified aviation schools/universities; airport rescue/firefighting groups; government agencies; museums and other aviation education organizations for a B-727 airplane from the company’s retiring fleet. To be considered for this donation, please submit a detailed summary of your organization, including information about your program, how the aircraft would enhance your program and any joint use opportunities with other area programs to increase the utilization of the asset.And here are some more. I could not find the website links to these, however, as much contact information I could gather, I have it posted alongside.
  72. Alpha Eta Rho Scholarship – Alpha Eta Rho, National Headquarters, 4627 Ocean Blvd., #220, San Diego, CA 92109. – Alpha Eta Rho offers five annual $500 scholarships to active members of the Alpha Eta Rho.
  73. Aviation Council of Pennsylvania – 3111 Arcadia Ave., Allentown, PA 18103.
  74. Civil Air Patrol Scholarship – CAP offers several scholarships to its members who have achieved the Billy Mitchell award, or senior rating in Level II of the training program. Amounts range from $750 to $1,500; the number of awards varies based on funding. Applications are available through squadron commanders.
  75. Eastern New England 99’s Aviation Career Scholarship – 14 Cooke Place,Warwick, RI 0288 (New England Residents only).
  76. Ernie Ayer Aviation Scholarship – Contact by e-mail: TAyer73352@aol.com, Contact by phone: (201) 447-4164. The amount of this aviation scholarship is open. The award will be made in installments following the achievement of certain goals. Two letters of recommendation and an official transcript are required.
  77. Eugene Kropf Scholarship – c/o Professor Bernard W. Wulle, Aviation Technology Department, 1 Purdue Airport Rd., West Lafayette, IN 47906-3398. A $500 scholarship is available to students in an Aviation program at any grade level, with a 3.0 GPA. E-mail: bwulle@purdue.tech.edu.
  78. Florida Spaceport Chapter – The Ninety Nines, Inc. – 2289 Cox Road, Cocoa Beach, FL 32926. This scholarship is offered to female students 18 years of age and older to provide assistance in flight training for a career in the aviation field. Must hold at least a private pilot certificate. Applications will be judged on neatness as well as sincerity of purpose and need of financial assistance. Web site: www.ninety-nines.org or http://spaceport99s.tripod.com.
  79. Joseph Frasca Excellence in Aviation Scholarship – Dr. David A. NewMyer c/o College of Applied Sciences and Arts, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901-6623; (618) 453-8898. Two $1,000 scholarships will be awarded to juniors or seniors with a 3.0 GPA. Applicants must hold FAA certifications in either aviation maintenance or flight, have membership in an aviation organization, and have financial need. E-mail: newmyer@siu.edu.
  80. General Aviation Manufacturers Association – 1400 K street NW, Suite 801, Washington, DC 20005-2485.
  81. Greater Miami Aviation Association Grover Loening Scholarship – 621 East Ridge Village Drive, Miami, FL 33157; (305) 971-9365 Several scholarships of up to $5,000 are available to students who have completed 30 credits, 15 of which must be in aviation. students must have a 3.0 g.p.a. or higher in the field of Aviation and must be U.S. citizens.
  82. Illinois Pilot Association Scholarship – IPS State Headquarters, 801 1/2 S.4th St., Apt. A, Springfield, IL 62703. IPS offers one annual $500 scholarship to a student involved in an aviation degree program.
  83. International Aviation Career Scholarship – Contact: ISA +21, PO Box 38644, Denver, CO 80238. Annual $1,200 scholarship awarded to a female pilot with a commercial license and at least 250 hours flight time and who is pursuing a career as an airline pilot. Sponsored by International Association of Women Airline Pilots.
  84. MAPA Safety Foundation – P.O. Box 46067, San Antonio, TX 78246-0607.
  85. Marion Barnick Memorial Scholarship – $1,000 scholarship to a female who holds at least a private pilot certificate and is either a member of the Ninety Nines (99’s) or a student at San Jose State, Gavilian College, Foothill College or West Valley College in California. For further scholarship information visit the Santa Clara Valley 99’s web page at http://www.pilotsguide.com/scv99s/ or call their voice mail that at (408) 327-9505.
  86. McAllister Memorial Scholarship – AOPA, 421 Aviation Way, MD, 21701. McNeil Consumer Products Company 7050 Camp Hill Road, Fort Washington, PA 19034-2299.
  87. Montana Department of Transportation Aeronautics Division, 2630 Airport Rd. P.O. Box 5178, Helena, MT 59604-5178.
  88. Mooney Aircraft Pilot’s Association – MAPA Safety Foundation Inc. PO Box 460607 San Antonio, TX 78246-0607. To receive an application, please send a self addressed envelope to address above.
  89. Nancy Horton “Touch the face of God” Scholarship – Nancy Horton Scholarship Fund, Inc., 4466 NE 91st Ave. Portland, OR 97220-5024. Scholarship offered in memory of Nancy Horton for female students 18 years of age or older training for their commercial aviation license or above. Applicants must have a 3.0 GPA, be highly recommended by her flight instructor, and have a letter of recommendation.
  90. National Air Transport Association – Lisa Copella, National Air Transport Association Foundation, 4226 King St., Alexandria, VA 22302; (703) 845-9000. NATA offers two grants each year under the Pioneer of Flight Scholarship Program. There are two scholarships for applicants pursuing careers in General Aviation as opposed to commercial airlines. Both grants are for $2,500. The academic scholarship is renewable for one year if academic excellence is maintained.
  91. National Space Club – Dr. Robert H. Goddard Scholarship – 2000 L Street NW, Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036-4907. The National Space Club sponsors a $10,000 award to a student who is a junior enrolled in an aerospace program. Must be a U.S. citizen.
  92. Ninety Nines, Inc. (99’s) – Contact Thom Griffith, Chairman, Amelia Earhart Memorial Scholarship Committee, 134 Robinhood Lane, Costa Mesa, CA 9261. The Ninety-Nines award a scholarship to female pilots. The scholarship amount depends on the recipient’s needs. For further information.
  93. Organization of Black Airline Pilots (OBAP) P.O. Box 50666 Phoenix, AZ 85076-0666.
  94. Pioneers of Flight – UAA c/o Central Missouri State University, TR Gaines #210, Mr. Steve Quick, Warrensburg, MO 64093; (660) 543-4085. Pioneers of Flight offers four scholarships up to $2,500. Applicants must be nominated. Must have a 3.0 GPA, and be a full-time student.
  95. Phi Chi Theta Foundation Scholarship for Women – Scholarship Chairman, 8656 Totempole Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45249. The foundation sponsors one to three $1,000 scholarships for full-time graduate female students pursuing a business administration degree who have completed at least one semester of study. Recipients are selected based on scholastic achievement, leadership potential, motivation, and financial need.
  96. Safe Association Scholarship – c/o Scholarship Coordinator, Embry-Riddle, 3200 Willow Creek Road, Prescott, AZ 86301-3720. A $1,000 scholarship is awarded to full-time upper-class student or graduate student with a 3.0 GPA.
  97. Soaring Society of America Youth Soaring Scholarship – CADET Scholarship, Soaring Society of America, PO Box E, Hobbs, NM 88241. $600 towards a sailplane flying lessons, and lesser prizes of textbooks and memberships. Young persons between ages 14 and 22 and not holders of any FAA pilot licenses. Application forms are available at gliderports only.
  98. Southeastern Airport Managers Association Scholarship – Two annual awards up to $1,500 for students with a B.S. degree in airport management or directly related curriculum. Contact; Southeastern Airport, Manager Association, c/o John R. Games, Treasurer, Owensboro-Daviess County Regional Airport, PO Box 1913, Owensboro, KY 42302.
  99. Student Pilot Network Scholarship – SPN is offering a single scholarship in the amount of $1000 which will go towards the flight training costs of a current or prospective flight training student enrolled in or accepted at any flight training program.
  100. Virginia Airport Operators Council Aviation Scholarship Award – VOAC Scholarship, c/o Herbert B. Armstrong, Airway Science Program, Hampton University, Hampton, VA 23688. $500 scholarship and two runners-up receive $50 towards a career in aviation. Recipients must be accepted by an accredited college.
  101. Whirly-Girls Scholarships – Whirly-Girls, P.O. Box 7446; Menlo Park, CA; 94026, 415-462-1441. Annual $4,000 scholarship to a female commercial airplane pilot to fund/obtain an initial or additional helicopter rating.

You should also check FAA website for additional information. In case I missed one or two. Plus the scholarship offerings and availability keeps on changing all the time. My advice is that you either subscribe for our newsletter, so whenever we announce something on the site you won’t miss out on time critical information.

First Black Woman Aviator in Aviation History

A role model in General Aviation Flight Training

The other day while browsing through African American Aviation History websites and blogs, I came across a name that I had heard many a times, but never got an opportunity (or simply being lazy maybe) to learn more about. So, I decided to spend some time, and read more about Elizabeth “Bessie” Coleman (Jan 26, 1892 – April 30, 1926).

Bessie Coleman happens to be the first African American (Black) Woman pilot in the history of General Aviation. She also happens to be the first American (not the first African American, or Black female, but The First American of any race or gender) to hold an international pilot’s license. Now, who would have guessed that! Not me.

Early Life

Popularly known as “Queen Bess”, she was born in Atlanta, Texas and was the tenth of thirteen children to sharecropper parents, George and Susan Coleman.

Queen Bess began school at the age of six, used to walk 4 miles a day to an all-black, one-room school. Despite sometimes lacking even basic educational amenities, Bessie was an excellent student, especially at mathematics.

In 1901, Bessie Coleman’s life took a dramatic turn: George Coleman left his family. He had become tired with the racial discrimination that existed in Texas. He returned to Oklahoma (Indian Territory as it was then called), to find better opportunities.

When she turned eighteen, Bessie Coleman took all of her savings and enrolled in the Oklahoma Colored Agricultural and Normal University (now Langston University) in Langston, Oklahoma. She just finished one term and ran out of money and was forced to return home.

Career Moves

Manicurist job in Chicago

In 1915, at twenty-three, Bessie Coleman relocated to Chicago, Illinois, with her brothers, and worked at the White Sox Barber Shop as a manicurist. This is where she started hearing the tales of pilots or aviators from who were returning home from World War I. They told her stories about flying in the war, and Bessie Coleman started to fantasize about being an aviator herself. At the barbershop, Bessie Coleman met many influential Black men, like Robert S. Abbott, founder and publisher of the Chicago Defender, and Jesse Binga, a real estate promoter. Bessie Coleman managed to receive financial backing from Binga and the Defender, which capitalized on her flamboyant personality and her beauty to promote the newspaper, and of course to promote her cause. She could not gain admission to American flight training schools because she was Black and a Woman. Even other Black U.S. aviators would not train her. Robert Abbott encouraged her to go study abroad, to France. French women were already flying at this time in history.

Flight Training in France

Bessie Coleman learned French language at the Berlitz school in Chicago, and then sailed to Paris on November 20, 1920. She learned to fly in a Nieuport Type 82 biplane, and on June 15, 1921 Coleman became not only the first African American woman to earn an international aviation license from the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale, but also the first African-American woman in the world to earn an aviation pilot’s license and the First American to earn an international pilot’s license. Determined to polish her skills, she spent the next two months taking lessons from a French ace pilot near Paris, and in September sailed back home for New York.

Airshow Performances

Bessie Coleman soon realized that in order to make a living as a civilian aviator—she would need to become a “barnstormer” stunt flier, and perform for paying audiences. But to succeed in this highly competitive arena, she would need advanced lessons and build a reputation. Returning to Chicago, she could not find anyone willing to teach her, so in February 1922, she sailed back for Europe again. This time she spent the next two months in France completing an advanced course in aviation, then left for the Netherlands to meet with Anthony Fokker, one of the world’s most distinguished aircraft designers. She also traveled to Germany, where she visited the Fokker Corporation and received additional training from one of the company’s chief pilots. She returned to the United States with the confidence and enthusiasm she needed to launch her career in exhibition airshow flying.

In September 1921, she became a media sensation when she returned to the United States. “Queen Bess,” as she was known, primarily flew Curtiss JN-4 “Jenny” biplanes and other army surplus aircraft left over from the war. In Los Angeles, California, she broke a leg and three ribs when her plane crashed on February 22, 1922. She made her first appearance in an American airshow on September 3, 1922, at an event honoring veterans of the all-black 369th American Expeditionary Force of World War I. Held at Curtiss Field on Long Island near New York City and sponsored by her friend Abbott and the Chicago Defender newspaper, the show billed Bessie Coleman as “the world’s greatest woman flyer” and featured aerial displays by eight other American ace pilots. Six weeks later she returned to Chicago to deliver a stunning demonstration of daredevil maneuvers—including figure eights, loops, and near-ground dips to a large and enthusiastic crowd at the Checkerboard Airdrome (now Chicago Midway Airport).

Fatal Plane Crash

On April 30, 1926, Bessie Coleman, at thirty-four, was in Jacksonville, Florida. She had recently purchased a plane in Dallas, Texas and had it flown to Jacksonville in preparation for an airshow. Her mechanic and publicity agent, William Wills, was flying the plane with her in the co-pilot seat. About ten minutes into the flight, the plane did not pull out of a planned nosedive; instead it accelerated into a tailspin. Coleman was thrown from the plane at 500 feet and died instantly when she hit the ground (she was not wearing her seatbelt). William Wills was unable to gain control of the plane and it plummeted to the ground. Wills died upon impact and the plane burst into flames. Although the wreckage of the plane was badly burned, it was later discovered that a wrench used to service the engine had slid into the gearbox and jammed it, causing the plane to spin out of control.

Legacy and honors

Her funeral in Jacksonville, Florida on May 2, 1926 was attended by 5,000 mourners. Many of them, including Ida B. Wells, were prominent members of Black society. Three days later, her remains arrived in Orlando, Florida, where thousands more attended a funeral at the city’s Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church. Her last journey on May 5 was to Chicago’s Pilgrim Baptist Church. An estimated 10,000 people filed past the coffin all night and all day. After funeral services, she was buried in the Lincoln Cemetery.

Over the years, recognition of Bessie Coleman’s accomplishments has grown. Her impact on aviation history, and particularly African Americans in aviation, quickly became apparent following her death. In 1927, Bessie Coleman Aero Clubs sprang up throughout the country. On Labor Day, 1931, these clubs sponsored the first all-African American Air Show, which attracted approximately 15,000 spectators. That same year, a group of African American pilots established an annual flyover of Bessie Coleman’s grave in Lincoln Cemetery in Chicago.

In 1989, First Flight Society inducted Bessie Coleman into their shrine that honors those individuals and groups that have achieved significant “firsts” in aviation’s development.

A second-floor conference room at the Federal Aviation Administration, Washington, DC, is named after her. In 1990, Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley renamed Old Mannheim Road at O’Hare International Airport “Bessie Coleman Drive.” In 1992, he proclaimed May 2 as “Bessie Coleman Day in Chicago.”

Mae Jemison, physician and former NASA astronaut, wrote in the book, Queen Bess: Daredevil Aviator (1993): “I point to Bessie Coleman and say without hesitation that here is a woman, a being, who exemplifies and serves as a model to all humanity: the very definition of strength, dignity, courage, integrity, and beauty. It looks like a good day for flying.”

In 1995, she was honored with her image on a U.S. postage stamp, and was inducted into the Women in Aviation Hall of Fame.

In November 2000, Coleman was inducted in The Texas Aviation Hall of Fame.

She is the subject of Barnstormer, a musical that debuted 20 October 2008 at the National Alliance for Musical Theater Festival in New York; the book and lyrics are by Cheryl Davis and the music is by Douglas Cohen.

In 2004, a small park in the Southside Chicago Hyde Park neighborhood was named “Bessie Coleman Park.”

Additionally, the Bessie Coleman park council was formed in 2005 as one of many responses to a serious increase in crime, shootings, and disorderly loitering in and near the park, at 54th and Drexel.

Notes
^ “Some Notable Women In Aviation History”. Women in Aviation International.
http://www.wai. org/resources/ history.cfm. Retrieved on 2008-04-10.
^ a b “Pioneer Hall of Fame”. Women in Aviation International.
http://www.wai. org/resources/ pioneers. cfm#1995. Retrieved on 2008-04-10.
^ “Texas Roots”. BessieColeman. com. Atlanta Historical Museum. 2008.
http://www.bessieco leman.com/ Other%20Pages/ texas.html. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
^ a b c d e f Rich, Doris (1993). Queen Bess: Daredevil Aviator. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press. pp. 37, 47, 57, 109-111, 145. ISBN 1560982659.
^ Powell, William J. (1934). Black Wings. Los Angeles: Ivan Deach, Jr.. OCLC 3261929.
^ Broadnax, Samuel L. (2007). Blue Skies, Black Wings: African American Pioneers of Aviation. Westport, CT: Praeger. p. 17. ISBN 0275991954.
^ “First Flight Shrine: Bessie Coleman”. First Flight Society. 2009.
http://www.firstfli ght.org/shrine/ bessie_colman. cfm. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
^ Texas Aviation Hall of Fame (14 July 2000). The Selection of Bessie Coleman for induction to the Texas Aviation Hall of Fame. Press release.
http://www.bessieco leman.com/ Other%20Pages/ release_1. html. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
^ Adam Hetrick (17 July 2008). “New Music: NAMT Announces Selections for 2008 Festival of New Musicals”. Playbill.
http://www.playbill .com/news/ article/119576. html. Retrieved on 22 January 2008.
^ “Bessie Coleman Park and Council”. Hyde Park-Kenwood Community Conference. 24 March 2007.
http://www.hydepark .org/parks/ BessieColemanPar k.htm. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.

Selecting Sunglasses for Pilots

Pilot Sunglasses – Aviator

A Summary of how to select best Sunglasses for Pilots

Here is the summary of things to keep in mind while selecting the best sunglasses for pilots, and for that matter, just about anyone who wants to protect his or her vision and have the best quality visual perception. There are other articles (listed at the bottom of this post) on this blog which talk about all this in great detail. Maybe you should read all those articles as well to gain maximum knowledge on the subject. 

SUMMARY.

  1. While adding to the mystique of an aviator, sunglasses protect a pilot’s eyes from glare associated with bright sunlight and the harmful effects from exposure to solar radiation.
  2. Lenses for sunglasses that incorporate 100% ultraviolet protection are available in glass, plastic, and polycarbonate materials. Glass and CR-39® plastic lenses have superior optical qualities, while polycarbonate lenses are lighter and more impact-resistant.
  3. The choice of tints for use in the aviation environment should be limited to those that optimize visual performance while minimizing color distortion, such as a neutral gray tint with 15 to 30% light transmittance.
  4. Polarized sunglasses are not recommended because of their possible interaction with displays or other materials in the cockpit environment.
  5. Since sunglasses are an important asset, whether or not refractive correction is required, careful consideration should be used when selecting an appropriate pair for flying.
  6. The technology associated with ophthalmic lenses is continually evolving, with the introduction of new materials, designs, and manufacturing techniques.
  7. Aviators should consult with their eye care practitioner for the most effective alternatives currently available when choosing a new pair of sunglasses.

References

  1. La Comission Interntionale de l’Eclairage (CIE). Figures correspond broadly to the effects of UVR on biological tissue.
  2. World Meteorological Organization. Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 1994, WMO Global Ozone Research and Monitoring Project – Report No. 37, Geneva, Switzerland: 1995.
  3. Rash CE, Manning SD. For Pilots, Sunglasses are Essential in Vision Protection, Flight Safety Foundation Human Factors & Aviation Medicine, July-August 2002; 49(4): 1-8.
  4. MEDICAL FACTS FOR PILOTS Publication AM-400-05/1 Written by Ronald W. Montgomery, B.S. Van B. Nakagawara, O.D. Prepared by FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute Aerospace Medical Education Division AAM-400, P.O. Box 25082 Oklahoma City, OK 73125
Tony Scott – Top Gun – the movie