Tag Archives: flying

Flight Training for Free? How?

Learn to be a pilot for free, no student loan required

Flight Training for Free

The other day I wrote a post about how you can pay for your flight training in case you are not able to obtain student loans. Getting a student loan for professional pilot training used to be much easier until about a few years ago. Well, they were never easy, but still they were much easier and much more abundant than what they are today. Most aspiring pilots were able to qualify, either on their own, and some others with co-signors etc. Now, it’s hard to even get a secured real estate loan to buy a house, so there aren’t many who qualify for an unsecured student loan for flight training.

Flight Training for FREE

FREE Flight Training?

But surely that doesn’t mean that one can not achieve the dream of becoming a pilot in the absence of a student loan or a federal aid or scholarship. I know a lot of people who have become pilots, many are even captains now with airlines around the world, and they never had a student loan, federal aid, scholarship, or even a rich parent paying on their behalf. So how did these aviators do it? Well, I’d say they found a way to complete the flight training for FREE!

Free? What’s Free? Nothing in life is ever free. Always there’s a catch. And in this case Free means – you come in with nothing out of your pocket, no student loan, federal aid or scholarship, or cash, just bring in yourself, get your training from Private to Commercial pilot, and pay with your work. There are jobs around which allow you to make lots of money, and if you can live frugally during this time, you can easily save up enough to pay for the entire training and become a Commercial Pilot within one years time.

There is nothing wrong about working hard to pay for your flight training; provided you want to become and airline pilot bad enough. I said airline pilot as that’s what most pilots want to be, even though there are many other professional pilot careers.

James – working on getting his CFI for FREE!

Free Flight Training

Free Flight Training

I have written posts here about how to pay for your flight training in the absence of student loans and government grants. James is a commercial pilot and has been trying to get a student loan to pay for his CFI, CFII and MEI. He picked his school – CFI Academy in Sacramento. He has exhausted all the venues of getting some bank or the government to help him pay for his flight instructor training, but with no success. He read this blog, contacted me, and he has been with us since a month now.

I decided I should post about his journey with us – earning money to pay for flight training. So far he is doing good. He has completed the job training and since last week he is on the job, earning and saving. His goal is to make and save $12,000 so he can pay for all 3 flight instructor ratings and multi-engine add on on his commercial pilot.I’ll keep posting here, about his success story. Maybe on a bi-weekly basis.

Louis Zamperini: The Airman Who Could Not Be Broken

Unbroken is the story of Louis Zamperini, a World War II airman whose B-24 bomber was shot down in the Pacific Ocean. Laura Hillenbrand, who also authord Seabiscuit, goes to great lengths to paint an incredible portrait of this pilot’s courage and resilience.

Zamperini was an avid runner before joining the Air Force. In college he broke numerous collegiate records and qualified for the 1936 Games in Berlin. He carried his team to 8th place in the 5000 meters, finishing with an incredible 56-second final lap.

Zamperini was deployed to the Pacific Theatre where his B-24 was shot down and he and one other crew member survived by eating raw fish and birds for 47 days before drifting onto Japanese-occupied land. The two become prisoners of war and are subjected to a harrowing ordeal that at various times nearly costs them both their lives.

Unbroken is an inspiring tale of courage in the face of impossible odds and redemption. Hillenbrand takes great care in telling her subject’s story and, using interviews with family members along with tireless research of Zamperini’s fellow POWs, is able to piece together this tale.

Aside from Zamperini’s incredible story, the book provides a lot of gristle for aviation enthusiasts. The story begins with a young Zamperini who sits up in bed after hearing a loud “whooshing” sound outside his bedroom in the California night sky. He runs out onto the lawn and looks up, only to see the German dirigible Graf Zeppelin floating through the night sky. Hillenbrand also details many of the planes and bombers the U.S. and Japanese militaries employed. Especially interesting are the times when Hillenbrand delves into the rudimentary technology the early U.S. bombers used. Her description of the bomb sights those crafts utilized give a new appreciation for the skill and precision that went into operating them.

Whether you consider yourself an aviation fanatic or you can’t tell the difference between a B-24 and a B-52, Unbroken is a book worth picking up. It’s inspiring subject matter and super-fine detail can be appreciated by everyone.

Logan is a guest blogger who writes about the aviation industry and jet charter services. He takes off from Teterboro airport on a regular basis.

I want to be That Guy

This blog is about General Aviation and Flight Training. So far I have been writing about flying lessons in an airplane, as this is what I have been involved in as a professional pilot and flight instructor. Even though before I got into airplanes, I used to fly gliders. And during my own flight training I got me an opportunity to sky dive, which was a total blast!

As a matter of fact, a few weeks ago I decided to drive down to the Lodi, CA airport, which is right off highway 99, and got some information on taking some professional sky diving lessons. I was hoping to be able to do this before I get back to working full time again. And today, a friend and a former student Christophe (from France) sent me a link to this cool Hang Glider pilot’s video on YouTube, and now I am thinking….:-)

I want to be that Guy – Nicholas Cage

The Flight Instructor Who Gave Selflessly

Guest Post: By Stephen Hopson

Today I was going to write about the success of the “Flight to Hartford” project with my church (you can find it listed under my name) and tie it into the universal laws of attraction and giving. But something else came up, taking priority.

I just learned that a man who helped me make my dreams of becoming a pilot seven years ago recently passed away. While I understand most of you didn’t know him, I want to share the story of how we met and the incredible impact he had on my life. I believe and hope you’ll be touched even if you’re not a pilot yourself.

We could all learn how to give selflessly like he did. I don’t know whether or not he was aware of the universal laws of attraction and giving but he was sure a good model for someone who did.

Here’s the story.

Right around the turn of the 21st century, I was still in the process of building my speaking and writing career so I was looking for a part-time job to pay the bills in between professional speaking engagements.

It was also at this time when I was already a month or two into flight training but my original instructor was offered a new job in Colorado so I was forced to find a replacement elsewhere.

One day, I had an inspiration to visit other airports to see if I could get a job at a place where they taught people how to fly. I thought, “Why not? Might as well shoot two birds with one stone.”

After visiting one or two and being told nothing was available, I decided to venture a little further out and try Oakland Troy airport, a 30 minute drive from my home.

It was nestled among a fast growing metropolitan area (Troy, Michigan, USA) complete with a new strip mall, new apartments, a giant Wal-Mart and an assortment of other industrial buildings. The only area with open space was a small golf course nearby. The airport was big enough to accommodate corporate jets yet small enough not to require an air traffic control tower.

Pulling onto the newly repaved airport parking lot, I noticed a small circular white terminal building up ahead.

“That must be where I can find the personnel department,” I thought.

Upon setting foot inside, I was surprised to see only a couple of people milling about, drinking coffee and reading the paper. A jovial looking man with rosy cheeks was pouring himself a steaming hot cup of coffee.

Seeing that I was a new face in the place, he set his coffee down and came barreling toward me at 800 mph with an outstretched hand. It startled the heck out of me.

After regaining my composure, I made the mistake of accepting his bone-crushing handshake, causing me to wince in pain.

Trying to hide my pained expression, I said, “Hi, my name is Stephen Hopson and I’m looking for the personnel department.”

“And I’m Don Solms,” he boomed. He was still pumping my now lifeless hand.

Finally releasing his grip, he said, “Oh, you want a job here?” His face brightened even more, if that were possible.

“Yes, do you know of any openings?” I was massaging my fatally injured hand, opening and closing it repeatedly.

“I think they might be looking for someone. HEY, let me take you over to the other building to Susan’s office. She’s the personnel director. COME ON!”

Just before going in her office, Don thrust his business card in my hand and said cheerfully, “Good luck. Shoot me an email later. You’ll have to come over to my hangar where I keep my plane. Okay?”

Keeping both hands within the safety confines of my pockets, I said, “Thanks Don.” I could tell he wanted another hand shake. Fat chance buddy!

Susan then introduced me to two guys named Carl Barnes and Jason Zimmerman. They were both young men who were in charge running flight services. The interview went well and I ended up being hired. As a line service rep, I would be responsible for fueling and towing airplanes, among other things. It marked the beginning of an incredible 4 years at that airport.

One day, Don was hanging out at his hangar where he kept his prized Skylane. It was sunny and breezy. His hangar door was wide open, allowing cool air to swirl around inside. It was an open invitation to anyone who happened to come by. Spotting me in the fuel truck (I was motoring my way back to the terminal after fueling a customer’s plane), he waved me in and offered me a cold soda.

Ten minutes into the conversation, my dreams of becoming a pilot somehow surfaced. I told him that I was actually looking for a new instructor and was trying to save up some money to resume flight training.

Before he could respond, my vibrating pager distracted me with a new text message. There was another fuel order and I had to get going.

“Don, I’ve gotta go – they are telling me to fuel another airplane. See ya later!”

As I got up to leave, he grabbed my arm and gave it a powerful squeeze. My mind did a quick flashback to that day in the terminal. This time his eyes were sparkling like stars. And he was grinning stupidly.

I was in no way prepared for what he was about to say next.

“I would be honored to be your flight instructor and I won’t charge you for my time. All you’d be responsible for is the cost of renting an airplane.”

My God, an angel was in my midst and I knew it.

Absentmindedly rubbing my arms to stem the tide of goose bumps that was spreading like wildfire all over my body, I said, “Wow, really? Thanks man!”

Then he turned serious for a moment and said, “When are you free for your first lesson?”

Thrown off balance since I didn’t expect it to happen so soon, I said, “Well, how about tomorrow?”

“Okay, you got it! ” he thundered. Then he winked as if he were saying, “our secret.”

The rest was history. He was true to his word. Months of flight training with this man proved to be quite an adventure.

He was best known as a jokester, even in the cockpit. Now you have to picture this in your mind. There we were, me, a deaf student pilot and him, a 250 pound flight instructor with a large football frame who liked to poke his elbow at me every time he made a joke. And get this…he thought everything he said was funny!

Ouch!

Aside from his wry sense humor, he was one of the most patient flight instructors I would ever have. Every time we got ready for a lesson, he’d explain in the classroom what we were going to do and then we’d go up and fly.

If he wanted to explain something while we were flying, he’d take control of the airplane while I read his lips and then we’d resume the lesson. Don was one of those rare flight instructors who did not care about building flight time for a future career with the airlines. He was in it for the long haul. In fact, it wasn’t until after 50 plus years of flying and instructing that he finally hung up his wings last year.

He truly enjoyed the fine art of teaching and it showed. He never yelled at his students like some flight instructors who think they are drill sergeants with big egos. His students were his prized possessions and he treated all of them with the respect they deserved.

On December 3, 2000 Don had one big surprise up his sleeve. It was a calm, sunny day. We were scheduled to do some practice takeoffs and landings. After doing three of them, he instructed me to taxi over to the ramp by the white terminal building where I first met him months earlier.

Trying to hide his delight, he said, “Let me see your logbook for a sec.”

Arching my right arm as far back as I could behind the front seats, I snatched the logbook out of my bulging black flight bag and gave it to him.

Suddenly it dawned on me that today was “the day.” He was going to sign me off for my first solo flight!

I felt an involuntary shudder.

After scribbling his signature, he turned and looked at me. His brown eyes were sparkling again. The smile was even bigger than before. He was absolutely giddy, like a child on Christmas morning.

“So Mr. Hopson, are you ready?” he thundered.

“Yes, Don, get the hell out!” I thundered back, half joking.

Roaring like a lion, Don heaved his 250 pound football frame out of the airplane, closed and locked the door with a loud click. Then he did something that forever burned in my mind.

Like a five-star general sending his young fighter pilots off to war, he gave me a smart salute!

I almost burst to tears. It was deeply touching. No one ever did that to me before. Despite being more than ready to solo, I still felt a touch of trepidation so I returned the favor with a slightly shaky hand. Thank God he was too far away to see that.

Taxiing into position on the runway, I took a deep breath and firewalled the throttle causing the airplane to literally leap into the air. I remember thinking, “so this is what everyone means when they say the plane will bounce into the air without your instructor!”

Within seconds after takeoff, all the training kicked in and it was just another exercise around the airport pattern. The only difference was…well, I was alone.

After three takeoffs and landings, the venerable flight instructor waved me over and gave the signal to cut the engine. He stood there like a proud papa and motioned for me to go over to where he was standing. Instead of shaking my hand, he wrapped his huge arms around me and gave me a bone crushing hug. But, hey, I didn’t mind.

Five months later, one day short of my birthday, he finally signed me off to take my pilot certification flight test (i.e. “checkride”) with Mary Carpenter, one of the toughest but fairest FAA examiners from the area. He and Terry Ryan (his airplane co-owner at the time), both accompanied me on the flight to Pontiac airport, a mere 10 minutes away where the examiner’s office was located. He wanted to be there when Mrs. Carpenter and I were done with the checkride.

Two hours later, the examiner walked briskly into the waiting area, smiled and said, “Congratulations, Stephen passed with flying colors!”

Don roared his approval.

We all went out to have our pictures taken by the airplane and that’s when he said to me, “I’ll sit in the back seat on the return flight. Congratulations Mr. Pilot in Command!”

It was the greatest, grandest gesture another human being could ever have bestowed upon me. I’ll never forget it. He was that kind of man. Don believed in me so much that he was literally the only person at that airport who believed I would one day become the world’s first deaf instrument rated pilot.

Six years later, I did it, defying every naysayer in the aviation business. In February 06, I became the world’s first deaf instrument rated pilot. For that I salute Don Solms for believing in me.

Here’s to you Don!

Food for thought: Have you considered the power of the law of giving and helped make someone else’s dream come true this week?

Profoundly deaf since birth, Stephen Hopson is a former award-winning stockbroker turned motivational speaker, author and pilot. He works with organizations that are ready to explore and overcome adversity because no one is immune from it – adversity does not discriminate. His professional speaking services, Obstacle Illusions, include fun and passionate presentations, especially the story of how his fifth grade teacher forever changed his young life with THAT’S RIGHT STEPHEN!

You can view his newly re-designed website at http://www.sjhopson.com.

Stephen also maintains a blog called “Adversity University

How to Become a Pilot in the United States

Guest Post by Thomas F. Sullivan

There are many reasons to gain a Private Pilot License, also called a Private Pilot Certificate. The three main reasons are for recreation, business, or a stepping stone to the Commercial Pilot License. While many pilots in the United States get their flight training through the military, here we provide the steps needed to become a pilot by training at one of the many flight schools in America. Lets take a look at the steps which are needed in order to become a certified Private Pilot.

  1. The first step is a psychological step. You need to make sure you are in the proper mind set and have the proper attitude to learn how to fly. This means you should have a very good reason, at least for yourself, in terms of why you want to become a pilot. And a perfunctory reason will not work. The reason for this is because it takes unadulterated commitment on your part in order to gain a Private Pilot License.
  2. Along the lines of commitment, you will need to set aside a large chunk of time weekly for learning how to fly. You could just train on the weekend, but the draw back to this method is that learning to fly could take a long time, a very long time. Therefore, if possible, try to fly every good weather day, and therefore set aside time daily for flight training. It is very important you understand that the closer your lessons are to each other, the less money you will spend in the end. The national average in terms of the flying hours needed to obtain the Private Pilot License is 65 – 70 hours.
  3. Plan on spending around $8,000.00 USD to obtain the Private Pilot License. This includes instructor fee, cost to rent airplane, exams, books, and equipment. Some sources put the cost at about $7,000.00 USD. Again, the more frequently you fly, the lower the end cost will be. Assuming you are average in terms of number of flying hours needed (65 – 70 hours), plan on spending $7,000.00 to $8,000.00 USD.
  4. After you have decided that you truly want to gain a Private Pilot License, you understand the time needed, and you have worked out the financial aspect, you then can start to think about selecting the right flight school. When selecting a flight school, visit every flight school that is within a reasonable driving distance to where you live. The following two steps will help in your selection of a flight school.
  5. You need to decide if you want to become a tri-gear or conventional gear (tail wheel) pilot, or both. Do you want to take your check ride in a conventional gear airplane, or a tri-gear airplane. Today, most pilots take their check ride in a tri-gear airplane. But it should be noted that you will be a more proficient and a safer pilot if you are able to fly more then one type of airplane. This diversity includes being able to fly both tri-gear and conventional gear aircraft.Today, most pilots prefer to stick with a tri-gear airplane from start to finish, when getting their Private Pilot License. Select a flight school which provides both tri-gear and conventional gear aircraft for you to rent, so that you are able to fly both of these types of airplanes.You can train and take your check ride in a tri gear airplane, and later after you obtain your Private Pilot License, get a tail wheel endorsement. No matter how you slice it, the more different types of airplanes you can get checked out in and fly well, the safer you will be as a pilot.
  6. Also, in terms of flight school selection, you need to decide if you want to learn to fly at a FAR Part 141 school, or a FAR Part 61 school. In the United States, flight schools are required to operate under one of these two sets of rules, as laid down by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration). One is really not any better then the other. Flight schools which operate under FAR Part 141 provide a more formal curriculum, with slightly fewer hours required for certification, and flight schools which operate under FAR Part 61 are less formal, and hours needed for certification are a little bit more.But since the hours needed in order to obtain the Private Pilot License almost always is much more then the required hours for certification (65-70 hours is the national average), there is really no advantage to learning at a FAR Part 141 school. Your decision in terms of FAR Part 141, and FAR Part 61, should really be dependent on the type of learning environment you prefer. Some students do better in a more formal environment, while others prefer a more laid back, less formal environment.
  7. After selecting a flight school, you then need to select an instructor. Select an instructor you feel comfortable with, both in terms of personality and flying experience. There are basically two types of instructors in the United States. One type is trying to build flying hours and has a desire to move on beyond instruction to a commercial flying job which is more lucrative. The other type of instructor is a career instructor who prefers to instruct, and is not really flying to build hours, but enjoys teaching new students. Career instructors on average tend to be older then hour building instructors. In terms of these two types of instructors, one is really not any better then the other, and selecting an instructor you believe you are compatible with is what really is important. You need to have a professional learning situation, where personality incompatibility will not interfere with the process of becoming a pilot. Selecting the right instructor is probably the most important component in learning how to fly.
  8. Finally, for most areas of the United States, plan on starting the learning process at the beginning of the summer. You need to have plenty of good flying weather in front of you before you start. If you start in the fall, you may end up having to stop due to bad weather and may need to wait until the spring to continue, which means more time and money. Plan on getting the job done within a few months in the summer. This holds true for most areas of the country, but not all. Of course, if you are learning to fly in the Southwest or Florida, then when you start is really not a factor.

So there you have it. The steps you need to take in order to become a Private Pilot. The most important considerations are proper mind set and attitude, commitment of time and money, type of airplane you want to fly, and finally flight school and instructor selection.

To quote Leonardo da Vinci:

“For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return”

If you follow these steps, you can experience what only Leonardo da Vinci could only dream of, the archetypal dream of flight.

Thomas Sullivan, the author of this article, is a web developer and publisher who resides within the Boston, MA area. He is a Private Pilot, the creator of Intellego Web Publishing, and the creator and webmaster for Pilot Portal USA and Pilot Jobs.

8 Steps to an Airline Pilot Career Job

There are a few things that you should be familiar with, if you, or someone you know, has an interest in becoming an airline pilot. Most folks assume that one can simply apply for a pilot job at United or South West, and they will provide the training to become a pilot.  Well, this is as far as it can get from the truth and reality. Becoming a pilot for a major airline takes years of hard work, dedication, sacrifice, persistence and determination. And, no there is no other way really.

Of course you can join the military and pay your dues that way, but that still is all of the above, and takes a few years to get one into an airline cockpit.

Most people follow the civilian route, simply because they don’t feel like joining the military, and there is a lot more flexibility if you do it on your own. The following pilot certificates and ratings are needed for one to succeed in this pursuit:

1. Private Pilot Certificate

If you want to become an airline pilot, you have to get a pilot’s license.  (Read more about Pilot Certificate or Licenses) The first step is getting a private pilot license.  During this training you will get 40-80 hours of flight time, and learn basic stuff about airplanes like takeoffs and landings, navigation, maneuvers, weather and basic instrument skills.  In case you are wondering about your vision, airline pilots need to have vision of correctable to 20/20. There are about 250,000 private pilots in America.

2. Instrument Rating

An instrument rating is the next step after the private pilot certificate.  During your instrument rating or IR training you will add at least another 40-50 hours of flight time. You need to have IR or instrument rating because airlines always fly in all weather, so the pilot should be able to navigate without ever looking outside, and solely by reference to the cockpit instruments.

3. Commercial Pilot Certificate

After getting the instrument rating, you’d continue on to get your commercial pilot certificate; which requires 250 hours of total flight time, along with additional training which will make you a professional, safer, and experienced pilot.  The commercial pilot certificate allows one to work for a commercial operator (for instance an airline) and get paid. Many people get their multi-engine rating at this time as well.

4. Building Flight Experience

Now that you’ve got your commercial pilot certificate with instrument rating and multi-engine rating, it’s time for you to build some flight experience.  You should read my post 10 Ways to Build Flight Time for Airline Pilot Job here. Since you probably have only about 300 hours of total time, airlines won’t typically consider you.  Airline minimums are at least 1,500 hours, along with some other experience. Yes, there are always times when the demand is more than supply, and they end up hiring low time pilots as well, but it is rare, and very unpredictable. I will write more about it later in another post.

5. Instructor Certificate

So how do you get from 300 hours to the 1500+ that you need for the airlines? The most common way is flight instructing.  By becoming a flight instructor, you are able to build hours and get paid to teach others. A good place to go get your CFI Training done is CFI Academy. There are other options besides being a flight instructor, and you can read about those here at Top 20 Career Options as a Pilot.

6. ATP certificate

Major airlines usually do not  consider hiring a pilot unless he/she has an ATP certificate; ATP or an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate is a requirement for one to be a captain on an aircraft with an airline.  Regional airlines may hire you without one, which is a good way to build experience.

7. Get a 4 year College or University Degree

At least a four year college or university degree is preferred to land a job with a major airline.  The degree does not have to be in Aviation; you can major in just about any field you want. You can always apply for airline jobs without a 4 year degree, but you’ll be competing with others who already have one.  When it comes to investing the time and resources to interview, hire, and train applicants, employers always look at the best qualified applicants.

8. Start Applying

Once you’ve got the flight time, a college degree, and an ATP, and are ready to see if you’ve got what it takes, apply to every airline you can!  This way you can be picky when you get interviews.

New Charter Pilot Jobs in India

A new company in India is launching the country’s first small piston engine airplane on demand air-charter service, starting with a fleet of two Cirrus SR22 aircraft. Manav Singh, the Chairman of Air Car (and Club One Air) states that the seats are expected to be priced competitively with business-class airline tickets and half the price of competition’s air-charter options. The company will fly out of Delhi and serve destinations within a 300 mile radius, including several emerging cities that lack airline service. “Air Car offers the option to travel faster to these places at reasonable rates,” said Uttam Kumar Bose, former CEO of Air Sahara, and a partner in Air Car.

Air Car has 10 SR-22s on order per Mr. U.K. Bose. The company plans to add 2-3 airplanes each quarter and expand nationwide over the next 5 years. The company is also working to offer package deals to corporate clients.

“We will fly to short distances and the price to charter a plane would be as low as an executive class ticket in a full service carrier between Delhi-Chandigarh, which is about Rs. 10,000 one way” Manav Singh, chairman Air Car said.

Managing director of the company Mr. Uttam Kumar Bose said, “In India, only 200 people can afford to charter a plane in a year. We want to change that and provide low-cost options and in the next 2 years we are looking at 20,000 passengers.

So what does all this mean to unemployed DGCA CPL holders in India? New pilot jobs! If Air Car is planning to add 2-3 aircraft per quarter over the next 5 years, that equates to 8-15 new aircraft per year or about 50 aircraft over the next 5 years. Each aircraft usually should have a crew of 4 pilots each (small aircraft, charter on demand type flight operations), and that means 200 new pilot positions over a period of 5 years.

And I don’t think Air Car is going to be strictly SR-22 either. I am sure they are going to add various other smaller piston and jet aircraft to serve India’s short distance charter on demand market. Also, others are definitely going to join in to compete for the same market.

If you are a CPL holder in India, this should be a good news for you.

Amazing NTSB (Animation) US Airways Airbus Crash Ditching in Hudson

NTSB’s investigation hearings of the Jan 15th, 2009 US Airways’ Airbus Flight 1549 bird-strike incident which led to the ditching of the aircraft in Hudson river have generated some potential recommendations – developing an on-aircraft anti-bird technology for rounding-up and wiping-out thousands of Canada Geese. At the hearings, Airbus test pilots supported Captain Sullenberger’s decision; to ditch the aircraft in the river instead of trying to make LaGuardia or Teterboro airports.

Airbus’ fly by wire system was commended for allowing Capt. Sullenberger to maintain the best airspeed for the ditching simply by holding the joystick in full aft position and letting the computers do the the rest; not letting the aircraft stall while he simply maintained the wings level.The hearings also reviewed and made public a rather compelling NTSB video animation with overlay-ed ATC audio and CVR content (textual). A board member’s call for more research into onboard bird-repellant or bird-deterrent technologies is supported by at least one study, conducted by Qantas and Precise Flight, which concluded that aircraft equipped with pulsed landing light system resulted in fewer bird strikes.

2004 Tests conducted by the U.S. Agriculture Department were less definitive; but further research (specifically, into flash frequency and light wavelengths) may be recommended by the NTSB.

101 General Aviation and Flight Training Scholarships

Since I have been thinking about compiling a complete list of all scholarship programs available for aviation training, I am posting here the interim list that I have prepared already. And, if you know of a program that is not mentioned in my post, please leave me a comment so I can add it. Also, on another post I have posted the Federal Aid for Flight Training available for certain qualifying candidates and training programs.

  1. American Historical Association – Fellowship in aerospace history. The American Historical Association will annually fund at least one Fellow, for one academic year, to undertake a research project related to aerospace history.
  2. Astronaut Scholarship Foundation – Scholarships in science and engineering. The Astronaut Scholarship Foundation was created to ensure that the United States would maintain its leadership in science and technology by supporting promising students in science and engineering.
  3. ATCA Scholarships Program – Air Traffic Control Association. Air Traffic Control Association (ATCA) Scholarships are awarded to help support the financial needs of those deserving students who have chosen to seek higher education in the science of air traffic control and other aviation disciplines, as well as children of air traffic control specialists.
  4. Aviation Scholarship Foundation – Flight training scholarships for teens in Illinois and Indiana. Discontinued in 2007.
  5. Aviation scholarships – Louisiana Tech listing of aviation scholarships, some specifically for African-Americans.There are a number of scholarships available to aviation students. Because of the frequent changes in the scholarship offerings, it is best to check with the Professional Aviation office regarding the current availability.
  6. Texas Space Grant Consortium – Scholarships and fellowships for students attending TSGC institutions. All graduate and undergraduate students that are attending TSGC academic institutions are eligible to apply.
  7. Aerospace Education Foundation (AEF) – AEF provides 800 scholarships and grants to flight students and educators. Special attention given to military applicants.
  8. Aircraft Electronics Association Educational Foundation – The AEAEF offers (27) scholarships totaling over $66,000 to graduating high school seniors and enrolled college students, seeking degrees in the field of aviation maintenance, avionics, and aircraft repair.
  9. Air Force Aid Society’s Education Grant – The Air Force Aid Society provides $1,500 grants to dependent children of active, retired, or deceased members of the Air Force Aid Society. In addition, the grants require financial need and full-time student status.
  10. AOPA – The Airline Pilots Association offers a four-year renewable $3,000 scholarship to students who are children of medically retired or deceased pilot members of the Airline Pilots Association. The executive committee will also consider freshman college students; high school seniors should apply during the second semester of their senior year.
  11. Airports Council International – North America Commissioner’s Roundtable Scholarship – The ACI-NA offers five annual scholarships up to $2,000 for enrolled undergraduates seeking a career in airport management. Must have a 3.0 GPA.
  12. Air Traffic Control Association – ATCA offers $600-$2,500 awards to promising students in an aviation related degree program. Successful candidates will have scholastic achievement, financial need, and the drive to succeed in the aviation industry.
  13. American Association of Airport Executives – The AAAE Foundation scholarship will grant $1,000 each year to a number of students with a junior or senior class standing, who are enrolled in an aviation management program. Applicants should have a GPA of 3.0 or higher and financial need.
  14. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics – The AIAA offers an award of $2000 to sophomore and higher Engineering students with a 3.0 GPA.
  15. AOPA Air Safety Foundation -The Air Safety foundation sponsors one $1,000 scholarship for both the McAlester Memorial and Donald Burnside Memorial Scholarships. Students must have junior or senior standing at the time of application, a 3.25 GPA, and be enrolled in a non-engineering degree program.
  16. Aviation / Aerospace Education Foundation – Bessie Coleman Scholarship to entering first-year students, Eugene Bullard scholarship to upper-class students. Both offer cash scholarships of $1,000 to students pursuing a degree in aviation or aviation-related field.
  17. Aviation Distributors and Manufacturers Association Scholarships – ADMA offers two $1,000 scholarships to students of the professional pilot program enrolled in either an aviation maintenance or aviation management program. Applicants must be a third- or fourth-year student in their program, and selections are based on scholastic achievement, and the content of their application package.
  18. Aviation Scholarship Foundation – The Aviation Scholarship Foundation funds a full course of private pilot training, start to finish, for half a dozen inner city youth from Chicago in gliders and airplanes each year. Scholarships are awarded annually each April with an April 15th deadline.
  19. Experimental Aircraft Association Foundation – The EAA Offers a variety of awards and scholarships ranging from $200 to full tuition (including books and equipment). Awarded to students seeking careers in aviation. International students may apply. There is a $5.00 application fee.
  20. Festival of Wings Over Houston – The Festival of Wings over Houston offers several scholarships up to the sum of $5,000. Must be a full-time status junior with a 3.0 GPA.
  21. Hispanic Scholarship Fund -The Hispanic Scholarship Fund (HSF) is the largest Hispanic scholarship-granting organization in the nation. HSF offers different scholarship programs for students of various educational backgrounds. All applicants must be U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents of Hispanic heritage.
  22. National Business Aircraft Association -NBAA offers (2) $2,500 scholarships and (3) $1,500 scholarships to students who are at least in a sophomore, junior, or senior class standing.
  23. National Gay Pilots Association – The NGPA offers a $2,000 scholarship, however, it cannot be used to pay for the training needed for a Private Pilot License. Must be 18 or older and majoring in engineering, or airport management.
  24. NIFA and GAMA Harold Wood ScholarshipOne scholarship is offered to students in any degree program, having completed at least one semester, and having a 3.0 GPA or better.
  25. National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship – NSF Fellowships are available to U.S. citizens entering graduate study in engineering. The fellowship includes a $15,000 stipend. Special programs are available for women and minorities.
  26. Northeast Chapter – American Association of Airport Executives – AAAE offers (4) $1,000 scholarships for undergraduate juniors and seniors enrolled in aviation management, with preference given to residents of the Northeast region.
  27. Professional Aviation maintenance Association – PAMA will award more than $30,000 in scholarships. Individual recipients of $1,000 scholarships are selected on the basis of educational performance, work experience, participation in school and community activities, career commitment, future potential, and financial need.
  28. Rockwell Collins – Dallas Female and Minority Scholarship – Rockwell Collins offers a $4,000 scholarship to a female or minority engineering student. Must have a 3.0 GPA, be full-time, and have completed at least one year or more in Electrical Engineering or Computer Science.
  29. Society of Women Engineers – SWE offers several scholarships to female and minority students enrolled in an engineering, aerospace or computer science programs. The class standing varies depending on the specific scholarship, but ranges from incoming freshmen to junior class standing. The amounts range from $1,000 to $5,000. One application is for all grade levels.
  30. Transportation Clubs International – Transportation Clubs International offers several scholarships to students enrolled in a transportation-related degree program.
  31. University Aviation Association – UAA offers an annual $500 scholarship. Must have a 3.0 GPA, and be a UAA member.Below is the list of scholarships offered through Women in Aviation International. Click on the link and you will see all of these scholarship details on that page.
  32. Aircraft Dispatcher Course – Airline Ground Schools, Inc. Airline Ground Schools (AGS) will award one dispatcher training award leading to an FAA Aircraft Dispatcher certificate.
  33. Aircraft Dispatcher Course – Airline Dispatcher Federation (ADF) Scholarship. ADF will award one dispatcher scholarship donated by Airline Ground Schools, Inc. leading to a FAA Aircraft Dispatcher certificate.
  34. Aerospace Engineering Scholarship – American Airlines and American Eagle Engineering Scholarship. American Airlines and American Eagle will award one $5,000 scholarship to a student pursuing a degree in the field of engineering – aerospace/aeronautical, mechanical, or electrical.
  35. Aerospace Engineering Scholarship – Delta Air Lines Engineering Scholarship. Delta Air Lines will award a $5,000 scholarship to a student currently enrolled in a Baccalaureate degree in Aerospace/ Aeronautical, Electrical, or Mechanical Engineering.
  36. Aerospace Engineering Scholarship – WAI Connecticut Chapter Engineering Scholarship. The scholarship will be awarded to a woman who wishes to pursue a career in the aerospace industry in the field of Engineering.
  37. Flight Training Scholarship – Airbus A320 Type Rating Certificate Scholarships (2). Applicants for the Airbus A320 type rating scholarships must hold a bachelor’s degree, commercial pilot certificate, instrument rating, certified flight instructor certificate and multiengine rating.
  38. Flight Training Scholarship – Anne Baddour Scholarship. The Anne Baddour Scholarship will be awarded to a female pilot with the following accomplishments: a burning desire to become a professional pilot, have at least a Private Pilot Certificate, be on track towards the ATP.
  39. Flight Training Scholarship – AOPA Student Pilot Scholarship. As part of its commitment to growing the pilot population, AOPA will award a $3,000 scholarship to a woman pursuing a private, recreational, or sport pilot certificate who has obtained a student pilot certificate.
  40. Flight Training Scholarship – Betsy Goldbach Aviation Scholarship. I love flying and would like to encourage others to explore the wonders of the sky. This scholarship may be used towards a Private Pilot Certificate or a Seaplane Rating.
  41. Flight Training Scholarship – Bombardier Business Aircraft Services Lear 31A Pilot Training Type-Rating Scholarships (2). In memory of Richard E. Blose, Learjet 31A Instructor Pilot, Bombardier Business Aircraft Services is offering two (2) Learjet 31A pilot type-rating scholarships.
  42. Flight Training Scholarship – CAE SimuFlite Citation Corporate Aircraft Training Scholarship. CAE SimuFlite will award a corporate aircraft training scholarship. It will include Citation initial training resulting in a type rating upon successful completion of the course.
  43. Flight Training Scholarship – Continental Airlines 737 Flight Training Scholarships (2). Continental Airlines is offering four Boeing 737NG type rating training scholarships. Criteria requires a minimum of 1,500 hours total time, 1,000 hours turbine, 1,000 hours multi, 1,000 hours PIC.
  44. Dare to Dream Scholarship – The sponsor of this scholarship would like to make a difference in the life of one deserving person who is pursuing her dream in the world of aviation. A $3000 scholarship will be awarded to an individual working toward an instrument or multi-engine rating, commercial or CFI certificate.
  45. Delta Air Lines Boeing B737-800 Type Rating Certificate Scholarships (2) – Delta Air Lines will award two B737-800 Type Rating Certificates to qualified recipients that are currently enrolled or have a Baccalaureate Degree.
  46. Delta Connection Academy Scholarship – Delta Connection Academy is happy to provide one WAI recipient a $5,000 scholarship to Delta Connection Academy.
  47. ExpressJet Airlines, DBA Continental Express, Regional Jet Transition Course – ExpressJet Airlines is offering two scholarships to participate in the initial ground school instruction on the EMBRAER 145 with a FTD session and CRM course; the first step to your path of becoming a First Officer.
  48. The Keep Flying Scholarship 2010 – The Keep Flying Scholarship was created after 9/11 to offer an intermediate level flight scholarship. Sponsors Deborah Hecker, Evelyne Tinkl and Janet Patton are offering one $3,000 scholarship to an individual working on an instrument or multi-engine rating, commercial or CFI rating certificate.
  49. Kathy K. Hodgkins Memorial Scholarship (floatplane training) – Kathy K. Hodgskins was a pioneer in the aviation community in Maine. She not only had an airline career with Continental Airlines, but she also had a successful floatplane operation with her husband, Tim.
  50. Ride The Sun Scholarship – Looking for assistance to extend your horizons and increase your aviation skills? Use this $500 monetary award to help defer the costs for out of the ordinary flight education.
  51. From Rose to Rise Scholarship – This scholarship will be given to someone who has soloed and is working toward a private pilot certificate, and shows a well-rounded aviation interest besides piloting, such as active participation in aviation groups, and demonstrated interest/participation in aviation history, promotion, and/or education.
  52. Sporty’s Foundation Flight Training Scholarship (2) – Sporty’s Foundation is offering Recreational Pilot Flight Training Scholarships (2) for small aircraft maintenance technicians.
  53. Women Military Aviators – Dream of Flight Scholarship 2010 – Women Military Aviators (WMA) seeks to preserve, for history, the important role women have played in creating and supporting the American Spirit through their contributions to flight, aeronautics and space.
  54. Airbus Leadership Grant – One scholarship will be awarded to a student at the college level of sophomore year or above who is pursuing a degree in an aviation-related field, who has achieved a minimum GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) and who has exhibited leadership potential.
  55. The Boeing Company Career Enhancement Scholarship – The Boeing Company will award a scholarship to a woman who wishes to advance her career in the aerospace industry in the fields of engineering, technology development or management.
  56. Dassault Falcon Jet Corporation Scholarship – Dassault Falcon Jet Corp. is awarding a $1000 scholarship to support a woman seeking to pursue an undergraduate or graduate degree in an aviation-related field.
  57. Desert Jet Corporate Aviation Management Scholarship Desert Jet, an aircraft charter and management company based in the Palm Springs area of California, is sponsoring this scholarship to promote the professional development and leadership skills of business aviation pilots who seek careers in aviation management or desire to start their own aviation-related business.
  58. The Elisha Hall Memorial Scholarship – Elisha Hall (Mrs. Mark Bizzaro-WAI #2335) represented herself as a dedicated and passionate aviation professional. She was a leader, an explorer, and lived life to its fullest. She set both her sights, and her standards, high. To celebrate her life and accomplishments, Women in Aviation, The Wright Chapter, is offering a $1,000 scholarship to a woman who embodies the qualities that Elisha so splendidly exemplified, and is seeking to further her aviation career.
  59. If You Can Dream It, You Can Do It” Scholarship – Nicole Cagnolatti, A&P/Pilot has been the recipient of several WAI scholarships and benefited immensely from the assistance. She wants to personally contribute to the WAI Scholarships (for the 3rd year) by offering other aviation dreamers the opportunity to pursue their dream.
  60. Janet Clark Memorial Scholarship – The Washington State Chapter of Women in Aviation, International (WA-WAI) is offering a scholarship in the amount of $1500 in memory of Janet Clark, a member of the Washington State chapter. Janet worked with the FAA as an Airworthiness (maintenance) Aviation Safety Inspector. This scholarship is open to all aviation career fields and can be applied to an accredited program.
  61. PAI Consulting Aviation Safety Scholarship (3) – PAI Consulting, a women-owned aviation consulting firm that provides support to the government and industry, will award three $1,000 scholarships to women pursuing aviation safety studies.
  62. Women in Aviation, International Achievement Award (3). Two scholarship will be awarded to a full-time college or university student pursuing any type of aviation or aviation related career. A third scholarship will be awarded to an individual, not required to be a student, pursuing any type of aviation.
  63. Women in Corporate Aviation Career Scholarship – The Women in Corporate Aviation Career Scholarship is offered by the members and sponsors of Women in Corporate Aviation to any man or woman pursuing professional development or career advancement in any job classification of corporate/business aviation.
  64. Delta Air Lines Aircraft Maintenance Technology Scholarship – Delta Air Lines will award a $5,000 scholarship to a student currently enrolled in an Aviation Maintenance Technician Program (A&P) or a degree in Aviation Maintenance Technology. In addition to the $5,000 scholarship, the recipient will receive a trip to the 21st Annual International Women in Aviation Conference.
  65. Delta Air Lines – Engine Maintenance Internship – Delta Air Lines would like to extend a 2010 Summer Internship (13 weeks) opportunity to a student currently enrolled in a Baccalaureate degree in Aerospace/Aeronautical, Mechanical or Industrial Engineering. In addition to an internship position, the recipient will receive a trip to the 21st Annual International Women in Aviation Conference.
  66. Pratt & Whitney Maintenance Scholarships (6) – Pratt & Whitney will award six maintenance scholarships to individuals pursuing careers in aviation maintenance. Winners will have the option to attend any one of the maintenance courses offered by Pratt & Whitney or Pratt & Whitney Canada.
  67. Flo Irwin / Aircraft Spruce Scholarship – Flo Irwin was not a pilot, but she was a very astute businessperson who earned everyone’s respect in a “man’s world” as she built her business selling homebuilt aircraft parts. Aircraft Spruce has grown to be one of the leading distributors of aircraft parts worldwide by continuing Flo’s vision and business philosophy.
  68. GAT Wings to the Future Management Scholarship – GAT will give a scholarship to a female student in an aviation management or aviation business program at an accredited college or university.
  69. Women in Aviation Management Scholarship – This scholarship will be awarded to a woman in an aviation management field who has exemplified the traits of leadership, community spirit and volunteerism. The scholarship can be used to attend a leadership-related course or seminar to raise the individual’s level of management.
  70. Yeager Foundation WAI Scholarship Award – In 2005 the Chuck Yeager Foundation established a scholarship to assist those who may not otherwise be able to become involved in aviation. This scholarship will be awarded to a deserving WAI member who has applied for other WAI or Corporate Sponsor scholarships and who has unique circumstances that impede their ability to advance their aviation plans.
  71. FedEx Express B-727 Aircraft – FedEx Express is accepting applications from qualified aviation schools/universities; airport rescue/firefighting groups; government agencies; museums and other aviation education organizations for a B-727 airplane from the company’s retiring fleet. To be considered for this donation, please submit a detailed summary of your organization, including information about your program, how the aircraft would enhance your program and any joint use opportunities with other area programs to increase the utilization of the asset.And here are some more. I could not find the website links to these, however, as much contact information I could gather, I have it posted alongside.
  72. Alpha Eta Rho Scholarship – Alpha Eta Rho, National Headquarters, 4627 Ocean Blvd., #220, San Diego, CA 92109. – Alpha Eta Rho offers five annual $500 scholarships to active members of the Alpha Eta Rho.
  73. Aviation Council of Pennsylvania – 3111 Arcadia Ave., Allentown, PA 18103.
  74. Civil Air Patrol Scholarship – CAP offers several scholarships to its members who have achieved the Billy Mitchell award, or senior rating in Level II of the training program. Amounts range from $750 to $1,500; the number of awards varies based on funding. Applications are available through squadron commanders.
  75. Eastern New England 99’s Aviation Career Scholarship – 14 Cooke Place,Warwick, RI 0288 (New England Residents only).
  76. Ernie Ayer Aviation Scholarship – Contact by e-mail: TAyer73352@aol.com, Contact by phone: (201) 447-4164. The amount of this aviation scholarship is open. The award will be made in installments following the achievement of certain goals. Two letters of recommendation and an official transcript are required.
  77. Eugene Kropf Scholarship – c/o Professor Bernard W. Wulle, Aviation Technology Department, 1 Purdue Airport Rd., West Lafayette, IN 47906-3398. A $500 scholarship is available to students in an Aviation program at any grade level, with a 3.0 GPA. E-mail: bwulle@purdue.tech.edu.
  78. Florida Spaceport Chapter – The Ninety Nines, Inc. – 2289 Cox Road, Cocoa Beach, FL 32926. This scholarship is offered to female students 18 years of age and older to provide assistance in flight training for a career in the aviation field. Must hold at least a private pilot certificate. Applications will be judged on neatness as well as sincerity of purpose and need of financial assistance. Web site: www.ninety-nines.org or http://spaceport99s.tripod.com.
  79. Joseph Frasca Excellence in Aviation Scholarship – Dr. David A. NewMyer c/o College of Applied Sciences and Arts, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901-6623; (618) 453-8898. Two $1,000 scholarships will be awarded to juniors or seniors with a 3.0 GPA. Applicants must hold FAA certifications in either aviation maintenance or flight, have membership in an aviation organization, and have financial need. E-mail: newmyer@siu.edu.
  80. General Aviation Manufacturers Association – 1400 K street NW, Suite 801, Washington, DC 20005-2485.
  81. Greater Miami Aviation Association Grover Loening Scholarship – 621 East Ridge Village Drive, Miami, FL 33157; (305) 971-9365 Several scholarships of up to $5,000 are available to students who have completed 30 credits, 15 of which must be in aviation. students must have a 3.0 g.p.a. or higher in the field of Aviation and must be U.S. citizens.
  82. Illinois Pilot Association Scholarship – IPS State Headquarters, 801 1/2 S.4th St., Apt. A, Springfield, IL 62703. IPS offers one annual $500 scholarship to a student involved in an aviation degree program.
  83. International Aviation Career Scholarship – Contact: ISA +21, PO Box 38644, Denver, CO 80238. Annual $1,200 scholarship awarded to a female pilot with a commercial license and at least 250 hours flight time and who is pursuing a career as an airline pilot. Sponsored by International Association of Women Airline Pilots.
  84. MAPA Safety Foundation – P.O. Box 46067, San Antonio, TX 78246-0607.
  85. Marion Barnick Memorial Scholarship – $1,000 scholarship to a female who holds at least a private pilot certificate and is either a member of the Ninety Nines (99’s) or a student at San Jose State, Gavilian College, Foothill College or West Valley College in California. For further scholarship information visit the Santa Clara Valley 99’s web page at http://www.pilotsguide.com/scv99s/ or call their voice mail that at (408) 327-9505.
  86. McAllister Memorial Scholarship – AOPA, 421 Aviation Way, MD, 21701. McNeil Consumer Products Company 7050 Camp Hill Road, Fort Washington, PA 19034-2299.
  87. Montana Department of Transportation Aeronautics Division, 2630 Airport Rd. P.O. Box 5178, Helena, MT 59604-5178.
  88. Mooney Aircraft Pilot’s Association – MAPA Safety Foundation Inc. PO Box 460607 San Antonio, TX 78246-0607. To receive an application, please send a self addressed envelope to address above.
  89. Nancy Horton “Touch the face of God” Scholarship – Nancy Horton Scholarship Fund, Inc., 4466 NE 91st Ave. Portland, OR 97220-5024. Scholarship offered in memory of Nancy Horton for female students 18 years of age or older training for their commercial aviation license or above. Applicants must have a 3.0 GPA, be highly recommended by her flight instructor, and have a letter of recommendation.
  90. National Air Transport Association – Lisa Copella, National Air Transport Association Foundation, 4226 King St., Alexandria, VA 22302; (703) 845-9000. NATA offers two grants each year under the Pioneer of Flight Scholarship Program. There are two scholarships for applicants pursuing careers in General Aviation as opposed to commercial airlines. Both grants are for $2,500. The academic scholarship is renewable for one year if academic excellence is maintained.
  91. National Space Club – Dr. Robert H. Goddard Scholarship – 2000 L Street NW, Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036-4907. The National Space Club sponsors a $10,000 award to a student who is a junior enrolled in an aerospace program. Must be a U.S. citizen.
  92. Ninety Nines, Inc. (99’s) – Contact Thom Griffith, Chairman, Amelia Earhart Memorial Scholarship Committee, 134 Robinhood Lane, Costa Mesa, CA 9261. The Ninety-Nines award a scholarship to female pilots. The scholarship amount depends on the recipient’s needs. For further information.
  93. Organization of Black Airline Pilots (OBAP) P.O. Box 50666 Phoenix, AZ 85076-0666.
  94. Pioneers of Flight – UAA c/o Central Missouri State University, TR Gaines #210, Mr. Steve Quick, Warrensburg, MO 64093; (660) 543-4085. Pioneers of Flight offers four scholarships up to $2,500. Applicants must be nominated. Must have a 3.0 GPA, and be a full-time student.
  95. Phi Chi Theta Foundation Scholarship for Women – Scholarship Chairman, 8656 Totempole Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45249. The foundation sponsors one to three $1,000 scholarships for full-time graduate female students pursuing a business administration degree who have completed at least one semester of study. Recipients are selected based on scholastic achievement, leadership potential, motivation, and financial need.
  96. Safe Association Scholarship – c/o Scholarship Coordinator, Embry-Riddle, 3200 Willow Creek Road, Prescott, AZ 86301-3720. A $1,000 scholarship is awarded to full-time upper-class student or graduate student with a 3.0 GPA.
  97. Soaring Society of America Youth Soaring Scholarship – CADET Scholarship, Soaring Society of America, PO Box E, Hobbs, NM 88241. $600 towards a sailplane flying lessons, and lesser prizes of textbooks and memberships. Young persons between ages 14 and 22 and not holders of any FAA pilot licenses. Application forms are available at gliderports only.
  98. Southeastern Airport Managers Association Scholarship – Two annual awards up to $1,500 for students with a B.S. degree in airport management or directly related curriculum. Contact; Southeastern Airport, Manager Association, c/o John R. Games, Treasurer, Owensboro-Daviess County Regional Airport, PO Box 1913, Owensboro, KY 42302.
  99. Student Pilot Network Scholarship – SPN is offering a single scholarship in the amount of $1000 which will go towards the flight training costs of a current or prospective flight training student enrolled in or accepted at any flight training program.
  100. Virginia Airport Operators Council Aviation Scholarship Award – VOAC Scholarship, c/o Herbert B. Armstrong, Airway Science Program, Hampton University, Hampton, VA 23688. $500 scholarship and two runners-up receive $50 towards a career in aviation. Recipients must be accepted by an accredited college.
  101. Whirly-Girls Scholarships – Whirly-Girls, P.O. Box 7446; Menlo Park, CA; 94026, 415-462-1441. Annual $4,000 scholarship to a female commercial airplane pilot to fund/obtain an initial or additional helicopter rating.

You should also check FAA website for additional information. In case I missed one or two. Plus the scholarship offerings and availability keeps on changing all the time. My advice is that you either subscribe for our newsletter, so whenever we announce something on the site you won’t miss out on time critical information.