Tag Archives: pilot certificate

James – working on getting his CFI for FREE!

Free Flight Training

Free Flight Training

I have written posts here about how to pay for your flight training in the absence of student loans and government grants. James is a commercial pilot and has been trying to get a student loan to pay for his CFI, CFII and MEI. He picked his school – CFI Academy in Sacramento. He has exhausted all the venues of getting some bank or the government to help him pay for his flight instructor training, but with no success. He read this blog, contacted me, and he has been with us since a month now.

I decided I should post about his journey with us – earning money to pay for flight training. So far he is doing good. He has completed the job training and since last week he is on the job, earning and saving. His goal is to make and save $12,000 so he can pay for all 3 flight instructor ratings and multi-engine add on on his commercial pilot.I’ll keep posting here, about his success story. Maybe on a bi-weekly basis.

The Flight Instructor Who Gave Selflessly

Guest Post: By Stephen Hopson

Today I was going to write about the success of the “Flight to Hartford” project with my church (you can find it listed under my name) and tie it into the universal laws of attraction and giving. But something else came up, taking priority.

I just learned that a man who helped me make my dreams of becoming a pilot seven years ago recently passed away. While I understand most of you didn’t know him, I want to share the story of how we met and the incredible impact he had on my life. I believe and hope you’ll be touched even if you’re not a pilot yourself.

We could all learn how to give selflessly like he did. I don’t know whether or not he was aware of the universal laws of attraction and giving but he was sure a good model for someone who did.

Here’s the story.

Right around the turn of the 21st century, I was still in the process of building my speaking and writing career so I was looking for a part-time job to pay the bills in between professional speaking engagements.

It was also at this time when I was already a month or two into flight training but my original instructor was offered a new job in Colorado so I was forced to find a replacement elsewhere.

One day, I had an inspiration to visit other airports to see if I could get a job at a place where they taught people how to fly. I thought, “Why not? Might as well shoot two birds with one stone.”

After visiting one or two and being told nothing was available, I decided to venture a little further out and try Oakland Troy airport, a 30 minute drive from my home.

It was nestled among a fast growing metropolitan area (Troy, Michigan, USA) complete with a new strip mall, new apartments, a giant Wal-Mart and an assortment of other industrial buildings. The only area with open space was a small golf course nearby. The airport was big enough to accommodate corporate jets yet small enough not to require an air traffic control tower.

Pulling onto the newly repaved airport parking lot, I noticed a small circular white terminal building up ahead.

“That must be where I can find the personnel department,” I thought.

Upon setting foot inside, I was surprised to see only a couple of people milling about, drinking coffee and reading the paper. A jovial looking man with rosy cheeks was pouring himself a steaming hot cup of coffee.

Seeing that I was a new face in the place, he set his coffee down and came barreling toward me at 800 mph with an outstretched hand. It startled the heck out of me.

After regaining my composure, I made the mistake of accepting his bone-crushing handshake, causing me to wince in pain.

Trying to hide my pained expression, I said, “Hi, my name is Stephen Hopson and I’m looking for the personnel department.”

“And I’m Don Solms,” he boomed. He was still pumping my now lifeless hand.

Finally releasing his grip, he said, “Oh, you want a job here?” His face brightened even more, if that were possible.

“Yes, do you know of any openings?” I was massaging my fatally injured hand, opening and closing it repeatedly.

“I think they might be looking for someone. HEY, let me take you over to the other building to Susan’s office. She’s the personnel director. COME ON!”

Just before going in her office, Don thrust his business card in my hand and said cheerfully, “Good luck. Shoot me an email later. You’ll have to come over to my hangar where I keep my plane. Okay?”

Keeping both hands within the safety confines of my pockets, I said, “Thanks Don.” I could tell he wanted another hand shake. Fat chance buddy!

Susan then introduced me to two guys named Carl Barnes and Jason Zimmerman. They were both young men who were in charge running flight services. The interview went well and I ended up being hired. As a line service rep, I would be responsible for fueling and towing airplanes, among other things. It marked the beginning of an incredible 4 years at that airport.

One day, Don was hanging out at his hangar where he kept his prized Skylane. It was sunny and breezy. His hangar door was wide open, allowing cool air to swirl around inside. It was an open invitation to anyone who happened to come by. Spotting me in the fuel truck (I was motoring my way back to the terminal after fueling a customer’s plane), he waved me in and offered me a cold soda.

Ten minutes into the conversation, my dreams of becoming a pilot somehow surfaced. I told him that I was actually looking for a new instructor and was trying to save up some money to resume flight training.

Before he could respond, my vibrating pager distracted me with a new text message. There was another fuel order and I had to get going.

“Don, I’ve gotta go – they are telling me to fuel another airplane. See ya later!”

As I got up to leave, he grabbed my arm and gave it a powerful squeeze. My mind did a quick flashback to that day in the terminal. This time his eyes were sparkling like stars. And he was grinning stupidly.

I was in no way prepared for what he was about to say next.

“I would be honored to be your flight instructor and I won’t charge you for my time. All you’d be responsible for is the cost of renting an airplane.”

My God, an angel was in my midst and I knew it.

Absentmindedly rubbing my arms to stem the tide of goose bumps that was spreading like wildfire all over my body, I said, “Wow, really? Thanks man!”

Then he turned serious for a moment and said, “When are you free for your first lesson?”

Thrown off balance since I didn’t expect it to happen so soon, I said, “Well, how about tomorrow?”

“Okay, you got it! ” he thundered. Then he winked as if he were saying, “our secret.”

The rest was history. He was true to his word. Months of flight training with this man proved to be quite an adventure.

He was best known as a jokester, even in the cockpit. Now you have to picture this in your mind. There we were, me, a deaf student pilot and him, a 250 pound flight instructor with a large football frame who liked to poke his elbow at me every time he made a joke. And get this…he thought everything he said was funny!

Ouch!

Aside from his wry sense humor, he was one of the most patient flight instructors I would ever have. Every time we got ready for a lesson, he’d explain in the classroom what we were going to do and then we’d go up and fly.

If he wanted to explain something while we were flying, he’d take control of the airplane while I read his lips and then we’d resume the lesson. Don was one of those rare flight instructors who did not care about building flight time for a future career with the airlines. He was in it for the long haul. In fact, it wasn’t until after 50 plus years of flying and instructing that he finally hung up his wings last year.

He truly enjoyed the fine art of teaching and it showed. He never yelled at his students like some flight instructors who think they are drill sergeants with big egos. His students were his prized possessions and he treated all of them with the respect they deserved.

On December 3, 2000 Don had one big surprise up his sleeve. It was a calm, sunny day. We were scheduled to do some practice takeoffs and landings. After doing three of them, he instructed me to taxi over to the ramp by the white terminal building where I first met him months earlier.

Trying to hide his delight, he said, “Let me see your logbook for a sec.”

Arching my right arm as far back as I could behind the front seats, I snatched the logbook out of my bulging black flight bag and gave it to him.

Suddenly it dawned on me that today was “the day.” He was going to sign me off for my first solo flight!

I felt an involuntary shudder.

After scribbling his signature, he turned and looked at me. His brown eyes were sparkling again. The smile was even bigger than before. He was absolutely giddy, like a child on Christmas morning.

“So Mr. Hopson, are you ready?” he thundered.

“Yes, Don, get the hell out!” I thundered back, half joking.

Roaring like a lion, Don heaved his 250 pound football frame out of the airplane, closed and locked the door with a loud click. Then he did something that forever burned in my mind.

Like a five-star general sending his young fighter pilots off to war, he gave me a smart salute!

I almost burst to tears. It was deeply touching. No one ever did that to me before. Despite being more than ready to solo, I still felt a touch of trepidation so I returned the favor with a slightly shaky hand. Thank God he was too far away to see that.

Taxiing into position on the runway, I took a deep breath and firewalled the throttle causing the airplane to literally leap into the air. I remember thinking, “so this is what everyone means when they say the plane will bounce into the air without your instructor!”

Within seconds after takeoff, all the training kicked in and it was just another exercise around the airport pattern. The only difference was…well, I was alone.

After three takeoffs and landings, the venerable flight instructor waved me over and gave the signal to cut the engine. He stood there like a proud papa and motioned for me to go over to where he was standing. Instead of shaking my hand, he wrapped his huge arms around me and gave me a bone crushing hug. But, hey, I didn’t mind.

Five months later, one day short of my birthday, he finally signed me off to take my pilot certification flight test (i.e. “checkride”) with Mary Carpenter, one of the toughest but fairest FAA examiners from the area. He and Terry Ryan (his airplane co-owner at the time), both accompanied me on the flight to Pontiac airport, a mere 10 minutes away where the examiner’s office was located. He wanted to be there when Mrs. Carpenter and I were done with the checkride.

Two hours later, the examiner walked briskly into the waiting area, smiled and said, “Congratulations, Stephen passed with flying colors!”

Don roared his approval.

We all went out to have our pictures taken by the airplane and that’s when he said to me, “I’ll sit in the back seat on the return flight. Congratulations Mr. Pilot in Command!”

It was the greatest, grandest gesture another human being could ever have bestowed upon me. I’ll never forget it. He was that kind of man. Don believed in me so much that he was literally the only person at that airport who believed I would one day become the world’s first deaf instrument rated pilot.

Six years later, I did it, defying every naysayer in the aviation business. In February 06, I became the world’s first deaf instrument rated pilot. For that I salute Don Solms for believing in me.

Here’s to you Don!

Food for thought: Have you considered the power of the law of giving and helped make someone else’s dream come true this week?

Profoundly deaf since birth, Stephen Hopson is a former award-winning stockbroker turned motivational speaker, author and pilot. He works with organizations that are ready to explore and overcome adversity because no one is immune from it – adversity does not discriminate. His professional speaking services, Obstacle Illusions, include fun and passionate presentations, especially the story of how his fifth grade teacher forever changed his young life with THAT’S RIGHT STEPHEN!

You can view his newly re-designed website at http://www.sjhopson.com.

Stephen also maintains a blog called “Adversity University

How to Become a Pilot in the United States

Guest Post by Thomas F. Sullivan

There are many reasons to gain a Private Pilot License, also called a Private Pilot Certificate. The three main reasons are for recreation, business, or a stepping stone to the Commercial Pilot License. While many pilots in the United States get their flight training through the military, here we provide the steps needed to become a pilot by training at one of the many flight schools in America. Lets take a look at the steps which are needed in order to become a certified Private Pilot.

  1. The first step is a psychological step. You need to make sure you are in the proper mind set and have the proper attitude to learn how to fly. This means you should have a very good reason, at least for yourself, in terms of why you want to become a pilot. And a perfunctory reason will not work. The reason for this is because it takes unadulterated commitment on your part in order to gain a Private Pilot License.
  2. Along the lines of commitment, you will need to set aside a large chunk of time weekly for learning how to fly. You could just train on the weekend, but the draw back to this method is that learning to fly could take a long time, a very long time. Therefore, if possible, try to fly every good weather day, and therefore set aside time daily for flight training. It is very important you understand that the closer your lessons are to each other, the less money you will spend in the end. The national average in terms of the flying hours needed to obtain the Private Pilot License is 65 – 70 hours.
  3. Plan on spending around $8,000.00 USD to obtain the Private Pilot License. This includes instructor fee, cost to rent airplane, exams, books, and equipment. Some sources put the cost at about $7,000.00 USD. Again, the more frequently you fly, the lower the end cost will be. Assuming you are average in terms of number of flying hours needed (65 – 70 hours), plan on spending $7,000.00 to $8,000.00 USD.
  4. After you have decided that you truly want to gain a Private Pilot License, you understand the time needed, and you have worked out the financial aspect, you then can start to think about selecting the right flight school. When selecting a flight school, visit every flight school that is within a reasonable driving distance to where you live. The following two steps will help in your selection of a flight school.
  5. You need to decide if you want to become a tri-gear or conventional gear (tail wheel) pilot, or both. Do you want to take your check ride in a conventional gear airplane, or a tri-gear airplane. Today, most pilots take their check ride in a tri-gear airplane. But it should be noted that you will be a more proficient and a safer pilot if you are able to fly more then one type of airplane. This diversity includes being able to fly both tri-gear and conventional gear aircraft.Today, most pilots prefer to stick with a tri-gear airplane from start to finish, when getting their Private Pilot License. Select a flight school which provides both tri-gear and conventional gear aircraft for you to rent, so that you are able to fly both of these types of airplanes.You can train and take your check ride in a tri gear airplane, and later after you obtain your Private Pilot License, get a tail wheel endorsement. No matter how you slice it, the more different types of airplanes you can get checked out in and fly well, the safer you will be as a pilot.
  6. Also, in terms of flight school selection, you need to decide if you want to learn to fly at a FAR Part 141 school, or a FAR Part 61 school. In the United States, flight schools are required to operate under one of these two sets of rules, as laid down by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration). One is really not any better then the other. Flight schools which operate under FAR Part 141 provide a more formal curriculum, with slightly fewer hours required for certification, and flight schools which operate under FAR Part 61 are less formal, and hours needed for certification are a little bit more.But since the hours needed in order to obtain the Private Pilot License almost always is much more then the required hours for certification (65-70 hours is the national average), there is really no advantage to learning at a FAR Part 141 school. Your decision in terms of FAR Part 141, and FAR Part 61, should really be dependent on the type of learning environment you prefer. Some students do better in a more formal environment, while others prefer a more laid back, less formal environment.
  7. After selecting a flight school, you then need to select an instructor. Select an instructor you feel comfortable with, both in terms of personality and flying experience. There are basically two types of instructors in the United States. One type is trying to build flying hours and has a desire to move on beyond instruction to a commercial flying job which is more lucrative. The other type of instructor is a career instructor who prefers to instruct, and is not really flying to build hours, but enjoys teaching new students. Career instructors on average tend to be older then hour building instructors. In terms of these two types of instructors, one is really not any better then the other, and selecting an instructor you believe you are compatible with is what really is important. You need to have a professional learning situation, where personality incompatibility will not interfere with the process of becoming a pilot. Selecting the right instructor is probably the most important component in learning how to fly.
  8. Finally, for most areas of the United States, plan on starting the learning process at the beginning of the summer. You need to have plenty of good flying weather in front of you before you start. If you start in the fall, you may end up having to stop due to bad weather and may need to wait until the spring to continue, which means more time and money. Plan on getting the job done within a few months in the summer. This holds true for most areas of the country, but not all. Of course, if you are learning to fly in the Southwest or Florida, then when you start is really not a factor.

So there you have it. The steps you need to take in order to become a Private Pilot. The most important considerations are proper mind set and attitude, commitment of time and money, type of airplane you want to fly, and finally flight school and instructor selection.

To quote Leonardo da Vinci:

“For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return”

If you follow these steps, you can experience what only Leonardo da Vinci could only dream of, the archetypal dream of flight.

Thomas Sullivan, the author of this article, is a web developer and publisher who resides within the Boston, MA area. He is a Private Pilot, the creator of Intellego Web Publishing, and the creator and webmaster for Pilot Portal USA and Pilot Jobs.

5 Questions you should ask yourself before starting Flight Training

Have you been thinking about learning to fly an airplane? Or have you thought about it in the past? How about, have you ever dreamed about piloting an airplane? If you answered yes to any of the above questions, then go ahead and read on.

Learning to fly an airplane is fun, easy, and a mission possible in most people’s case. Here, read the questions below that you should ask yourself if you ever considered learning to fly or getting yourself a pilot’s certificate.

1. Motivation – What do I need to learn how to fly for; pleasure, business or as a career?

2. Location –Where should I go get my flight training done?

3. Source – What type of flight training provider would be best for me?

4. Scheduling – Full time, part time, formal or informal, what type of scheduling would work the best for me?

5. Financial – How am I going to pay for my training? Would I need financial aid, student loan, personal loan, or some other type of financial assistance?

The reason you should ask these questions to yourself is because it helps you chose the right program, and also helps you understand the budgets and time / effort commitment required. I’ll give you some ballpark numbers here to think about:

If you want to learn how to fly for pleasure, you are looking at about a total of 60-70 hours of flight training time, and about 40-50 hours of ground studies, and to get the best bang for the buck, you should expect about 10-12 hours of training time per week. If it is for pleasure, then you really can simply take the training at your own convenience, or go to one of those vacation / accelerated training places with or without your family. Cost of the training will depend on many variables, like when, where and which aircraft. But for most people, you are looking at about $6000 to $10,000 price range. Of course, there are ways to make it cheaper as well as luxurious and high end as well.

For business reasons, the basic training as above is still required, but what changes is the motivating factor, and possibly some tax advantages, both for training and then actually renting / owning an aircraft and the related cost factors (operating expenses).

As a career? Well, now that is a very detailed topic, I can write a few books on it. Write me an email for any specific questions, and subscribe to this blog (RSS Feed). I write about all this here just about everyday. So read and educate yourself. Here, read these 2 posts for starters: Top 20 Career Options as a Pilot, and 101 General Aviation and Flight Training Scholarships.

Where to get your flight training? Options could be: a local flight training school, a flying club, an independent flight instructor (or CFI as we call them), a pilot flight instructor friend, a vacation / accelerated flight training gig, formal accredited flight training institutes, military academies, aviation college or university program, and so on.

101 General Aviation and Flight Training Scholarships

Since I have been thinking about compiling a complete list of all scholarship programs available for aviation training, I am posting here the interim list that I have prepared already. And, if you know of a program that is not mentioned in my post, please leave me a comment so I can add it. Also, on another post I have posted the Federal Aid for Flight Training available for certain qualifying candidates and training programs.

  1. American Historical Association – Fellowship in aerospace history. The American Historical Association will annually fund at least one Fellow, for one academic year, to undertake a research project related to aerospace history.
  2. Astronaut Scholarship Foundation – Scholarships in science and engineering. The Astronaut Scholarship Foundation was created to ensure that the United States would maintain its leadership in science and technology by supporting promising students in science and engineering.
  3. ATCA Scholarships Program – Air Traffic Control Association. Air Traffic Control Association (ATCA) Scholarships are awarded to help support the financial needs of those deserving students who have chosen to seek higher education in the science of air traffic control and other aviation disciplines, as well as children of air traffic control specialists.
  4. Aviation Scholarship Foundation – Flight training scholarships for teens in Illinois and Indiana. Discontinued in 2007.
  5. Aviation scholarships – Louisiana Tech listing of aviation scholarships, some specifically for African-Americans.There are a number of scholarships available to aviation students. Because of the frequent changes in the scholarship offerings, it is best to check with the Professional Aviation office regarding the current availability.
  6. Texas Space Grant Consortium – Scholarships and fellowships for students attending TSGC institutions. All graduate and undergraduate students that are attending TSGC academic institutions are eligible to apply.
  7. Aerospace Education Foundation (AEF) – AEF provides 800 scholarships and grants to flight students and educators. Special attention given to military applicants.
  8. Aircraft Electronics Association Educational Foundation – The AEAEF offers (27) scholarships totaling over $66,000 to graduating high school seniors and enrolled college students, seeking degrees in the field of aviation maintenance, avionics, and aircraft repair.
  9. Air Force Aid Society’s Education Grant – The Air Force Aid Society provides $1,500 grants to dependent children of active, retired, or deceased members of the Air Force Aid Society. In addition, the grants require financial need and full-time student status.
  10. AOPA – The Airline Pilots Association offers a four-year renewable $3,000 scholarship to students who are children of medically retired or deceased pilot members of the Airline Pilots Association. The executive committee will also consider freshman college students; high school seniors should apply during the second semester of their senior year.
  11. Airports Council International – North America Commissioner’s Roundtable Scholarship – The ACI-NA offers five annual scholarships up to $2,000 for enrolled undergraduates seeking a career in airport management. Must have a 3.0 GPA.
  12. Air Traffic Control Association – ATCA offers $600-$2,500 awards to promising students in an aviation related degree program. Successful candidates will have scholastic achievement, financial need, and the drive to succeed in the aviation industry.
  13. American Association of Airport Executives – The AAAE Foundation scholarship will grant $1,000 each year to a number of students with a junior or senior class standing, who are enrolled in an aviation management program. Applicants should have a GPA of 3.0 or higher and financial need.
  14. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics – The AIAA offers an award of $2000 to sophomore and higher Engineering students with a 3.0 GPA.
  15. AOPA Air Safety Foundation -The Air Safety foundation sponsors one $1,000 scholarship for both the McAlester Memorial and Donald Burnside Memorial Scholarships. Students must have junior or senior standing at the time of application, a 3.25 GPA, and be enrolled in a non-engineering degree program.
  16. Aviation / Aerospace Education Foundation – Bessie Coleman Scholarship to entering first-year students, Eugene Bullard scholarship to upper-class students. Both offer cash scholarships of $1,000 to students pursuing a degree in aviation or aviation-related field.
  17. Aviation Distributors and Manufacturers Association Scholarships – ADMA offers two $1,000 scholarships to students of the professional pilot program enrolled in either an aviation maintenance or aviation management program. Applicants must be a third- or fourth-year student in their program, and selections are based on scholastic achievement, and the content of their application package.
  18. Aviation Scholarship Foundation – The Aviation Scholarship Foundation funds a full course of private pilot training, start to finish, for half a dozen inner city youth from Chicago in gliders and airplanes each year. Scholarships are awarded annually each April with an April 15th deadline.
  19. Experimental Aircraft Association Foundation – The EAA Offers a variety of awards and scholarships ranging from $200 to full tuition (including books and equipment). Awarded to students seeking careers in aviation. International students may apply. There is a $5.00 application fee.
  20. Festival of Wings Over Houston – The Festival of Wings over Houston offers several scholarships up to the sum of $5,000. Must be a full-time status junior with a 3.0 GPA.
  21. Hispanic Scholarship Fund -The Hispanic Scholarship Fund (HSF) is the largest Hispanic scholarship-granting organization in the nation. HSF offers different scholarship programs for students of various educational backgrounds. All applicants must be U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents of Hispanic heritage.
  22. National Business Aircraft Association -NBAA offers (2) $2,500 scholarships and (3) $1,500 scholarships to students who are at least in a sophomore, junior, or senior class standing.
  23. National Gay Pilots Association – The NGPA offers a $2,000 scholarship, however, it cannot be used to pay for the training needed for a Private Pilot License. Must be 18 or older and majoring in engineering, or airport management.
  24. NIFA and GAMA Harold Wood ScholarshipOne scholarship is offered to students in any degree program, having completed at least one semester, and having a 3.0 GPA or better.
  25. National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship – NSF Fellowships are available to U.S. citizens entering graduate study in engineering. The fellowship includes a $15,000 stipend. Special programs are available for women and minorities.
  26. Northeast Chapter – American Association of Airport Executives – AAAE offers (4) $1,000 scholarships for undergraduate juniors and seniors enrolled in aviation management, with preference given to residents of the Northeast region.
  27. Professional Aviation maintenance Association – PAMA will award more than $30,000 in scholarships. Individual recipients of $1,000 scholarships are selected on the basis of educational performance, work experience, participation in school and community activities, career commitment, future potential, and financial need.
  28. Rockwell Collins – Dallas Female and Minority Scholarship – Rockwell Collins offers a $4,000 scholarship to a female or minority engineering student. Must have a 3.0 GPA, be full-time, and have completed at least one year or more in Electrical Engineering or Computer Science.
  29. Society of Women Engineers – SWE offers several scholarships to female and minority students enrolled in an engineering, aerospace or computer science programs. The class standing varies depending on the specific scholarship, but ranges from incoming freshmen to junior class standing. The amounts range from $1,000 to $5,000. One application is for all grade levels.
  30. Transportation Clubs International – Transportation Clubs International offers several scholarships to students enrolled in a transportation-related degree program.
  31. University Aviation Association – UAA offers an annual $500 scholarship. Must have a 3.0 GPA, and be a UAA member.Below is the list of scholarships offered through Women in Aviation International. Click on the link and you will see all of these scholarship details on that page.
  32. Aircraft Dispatcher Course – Airline Ground Schools, Inc. Airline Ground Schools (AGS) will award one dispatcher training award leading to an FAA Aircraft Dispatcher certificate.
  33. Aircraft Dispatcher Course – Airline Dispatcher Federation (ADF) Scholarship. ADF will award one dispatcher scholarship donated by Airline Ground Schools, Inc. leading to a FAA Aircraft Dispatcher certificate.
  34. Aerospace Engineering Scholarship – American Airlines and American Eagle Engineering Scholarship. American Airlines and American Eagle will award one $5,000 scholarship to a student pursuing a degree in the field of engineering – aerospace/aeronautical, mechanical, or electrical.
  35. Aerospace Engineering Scholarship – Delta Air Lines Engineering Scholarship. Delta Air Lines will award a $5,000 scholarship to a student currently enrolled in a Baccalaureate degree in Aerospace/ Aeronautical, Electrical, or Mechanical Engineering.
  36. Aerospace Engineering Scholarship – WAI Connecticut Chapter Engineering Scholarship. The scholarship will be awarded to a woman who wishes to pursue a career in the aerospace industry in the field of Engineering.
  37. Flight Training Scholarship – Airbus A320 Type Rating Certificate Scholarships (2). Applicants for the Airbus A320 type rating scholarships must hold a bachelor’s degree, commercial pilot certificate, instrument rating, certified flight instructor certificate and multiengine rating.
  38. Flight Training Scholarship – Anne Baddour Scholarship. The Anne Baddour Scholarship will be awarded to a female pilot with the following accomplishments: a burning desire to become a professional pilot, have at least a Private Pilot Certificate, be on track towards the ATP.
  39. Flight Training Scholarship – AOPA Student Pilot Scholarship. As part of its commitment to growing the pilot population, AOPA will award a $3,000 scholarship to a woman pursuing a private, recreational, or sport pilot certificate who has obtained a student pilot certificate.
  40. Flight Training Scholarship – Betsy Goldbach Aviation Scholarship. I love flying and would like to encourage others to explore the wonders of the sky. This scholarship may be used towards a Private Pilot Certificate or a Seaplane Rating.
  41. Flight Training Scholarship – Bombardier Business Aircraft Services Lear 31A Pilot Training Type-Rating Scholarships (2). In memory of Richard E. Blose, Learjet 31A Instructor Pilot, Bombardier Business Aircraft Services is offering two (2) Learjet 31A pilot type-rating scholarships.
  42. Flight Training Scholarship – CAE SimuFlite Citation Corporate Aircraft Training Scholarship. CAE SimuFlite will award a corporate aircraft training scholarship. It will include Citation initial training resulting in a type rating upon successful completion of the course.
  43. Flight Training Scholarship – Continental Airlines 737 Flight Training Scholarships (2). Continental Airlines is offering four Boeing 737NG type rating training scholarships. Criteria requires a minimum of 1,500 hours total time, 1,000 hours turbine, 1,000 hours multi, 1,000 hours PIC.
  44. Dare to Dream Scholarship – The sponsor of this scholarship would like to make a difference in the life of one deserving person who is pursuing her dream in the world of aviation. A $3000 scholarship will be awarded to an individual working toward an instrument or multi-engine rating, commercial or CFI certificate.
  45. Delta Air Lines Boeing B737-800 Type Rating Certificate Scholarships (2) – Delta Air Lines will award two B737-800 Type Rating Certificates to qualified recipients that are currently enrolled or have a Baccalaureate Degree.
  46. Delta Connection Academy Scholarship – Delta Connection Academy is happy to provide one WAI recipient a $5,000 scholarship to Delta Connection Academy.
  47. ExpressJet Airlines, DBA Continental Express, Regional Jet Transition Course – ExpressJet Airlines is offering two scholarships to participate in the initial ground school instruction on the EMBRAER 145 with a FTD session and CRM course; the first step to your path of becoming a First Officer.
  48. The Keep Flying Scholarship 2010 – The Keep Flying Scholarship was created after 9/11 to offer an intermediate level flight scholarship. Sponsors Deborah Hecker, Evelyne Tinkl and Janet Patton are offering one $3,000 scholarship to an individual working on an instrument or multi-engine rating, commercial or CFI rating certificate.
  49. Kathy K. Hodgkins Memorial Scholarship (floatplane training) – Kathy K. Hodgskins was a pioneer in the aviation community in Maine. She not only had an airline career with Continental Airlines, but she also had a successful floatplane operation with her husband, Tim.
  50. Ride The Sun Scholarship – Looking for assistance to extend your horizons and increase your aviation skills? Use this $500 monetary award to help defer the costs for out of the ordinary flight education.
  51. From Rose to Rise Scholarship – This scholarship will be given to someone who has soloed and is working toward a private pilot certificate, and shows a well-rounded aviation interest besides piloting, such as active participation in aviation groups, and demonstrated interest/participation in aviation history, promotion, and/or education.
  52. Sporty’s Foundation Flight Training Scholarship (2) – Sporty’s Foundation is offering Recreational Pilot Flight Training Scholarships (2) for small aircraft maintenance technicians.
  53. Women Military Aviators – Dream of Flight Scholarship 2010 – Women Military Aviators (WMA) seeks to preserve, for history, the important role women have played in creating and supporting the American Spirit through their contributions to flight, aeronautics and space.
  54. Airbus Leadership Grant – One scholarship will be awarded to a student at the college level of sophomore year or above who is pursuing a degree in an aviation-related field, who has achieved a minimum GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) and who has exhibited leadership potential.
  55. The Boeing Company Career Enhancement Scholarship – The Boeing Company will award a scholarship to a woman who wishes to advance her career in the aerospace industry in the fields of engineering, technology development or management.
  56. Dassault Falcon Jet Corporation Scholarship – Dassault Falcon Jet Corp. is awarding a $1000 scholarship to support a woman seeking to pursue an undergraduate or graduate degree in an aviation-related field.
  57. Desert Jet Corporate Aviation Management Scholarship Desert Jet, an aircraft charter and management company based in the Palm Springs area of California, is sponsoring this scholarship to promote the professional development and leadership skills of business aviation pilots who seek careers in aviation management or desire to start their own aviation-related business.
  58. The Elisha Hall Memorial Scholarship – Elisha Hall (Mrs. Mark Bizzaro-WAI #2335) represented herself as a dedicated and passionate aviation professional. She was a leader, an explorer, and lived life to its fullest. She set both her sights, and her standards, high. To celebrate her life and accomplishments, Women in Aviation, The Wright Chapter, is offering a $1,000 scholarship to a woman who embodies the qualities that Elisha so splendidly exemplified, and is seeking to further her aviation career.
  59. If You Can Dream It, You Can Do It” Scholarship – Nicole Cagnolatti, A&P/Pilot has been the recipient of several WAI scholarships and benefited immensely from the assistance. She wants to personally contribute to the WAI Scholarships (for the 3rd year) by offering other aviation dreamers the opportunity to pursue their dream.
  60. Janet Clark Memorial Scholarship – The Washington State Chapter of Women in Aviation, International (WA-WAI) is offering a scholarship in the amount of $1500 in memory of Janet Clark, a member of the Washington State chapter. Janet worked with the FAA as an Airworthiness (maintenance) Aviation Safety Inspector. This scholarship is open to all aviation career fields and can be applied to an accredited program.
  61. PAI Consulting Aviation Safety Scholarship (3) – PAI Consulting, a women-owned aviation consulting firm that provides support to the government and industry, will award three $1,000 scholarships to women pursuing aviation safety studies.
  62. Women in Aviation, International Achievement Award (3). Two scholarship will be awarded to a full-time college or university student pursuing any type of aviation or aviation related career. A third scholarship will be awarded to an individual, not required to be a student, pursuing any type of aviation.
  63. Women in Corporate Aviation Career Scholarship – The Women in Corporate Aviation Career Scholarship is offered by the members and sponsors of Women in Corporate Aviation to any man or woman pursuing professional development or career advancement in any job classification of corporate/business aviation.
  64. Delta Air Lines Aircraft Maintenance Technology Scholarship – Delta Air Lines will award a $5,000 scholarship to a student currently enrolled in an Aviation Maintenance Technician Program (A&P) or a degree in Aviation Maintenance Technology. In addition to the $5,000 scholarship, the recipient will receive a trip to the 21st Annual International Women in Aviation Conference.
  65. Delta Air Lines – Engine Maintenance Internship – Delta Air Lines would like to extend a 2010 Summer Internship (13 weeks) opportunity to a student currently enrolled in a Baccalaureate degree in Aerospace/Aeronautical, Mechanical or Industrial Engineering. In addition to an internship position, the recipient will receive a trip to the 21st Annual International Women in Aviation Conference.
  66. Pratt & Whitney Maintenance Scholarships (6) – Pratt & Whitney will award six maintenance scholarships to individuals pursuing careers in aviation maintenance. Winners will have the option to attend any one of the maintenance courses offered by Pratt & Whitney or Pratt & Whitney Canada.
  67. Flo Irwin / Aircraft Spruce Scholarship – Flo Irwin was not a pilot, but she was a very astute businessperson who earned everyone’s respect in a “man’s world” as she built her business selling homebuilt aircraft parts. Aircraft Spruce has grown to be one of the leading distributors of aircraft parts worldwide by continuing Flo’s vision and business philosophy.
  68. GAT Wings to the Future Management Scholarship – GAT will give a scholarship to a female student in an aviation management or aviation business program at an accredited college or university.
  69. Women in Aviation Management Scholarship – This scholarship will be awarded to a woman in an aviation management field who has exemplified the traits of leadership, community spirit and volunteerism. The scholarship can be used to attend a leadership-related course or seminar to raise the individual’s level of management.
  70. Yeager Foundation WAI Scholarship Award – In 2005 the Chuck Yeager Foundation established a scholarship to assist those who may not otherwise be able to become involved in aviation. This scholarship will be awarded to a deserving WAI member who has applied for other WAI or Corporate Sponsor scholarships and who has unique circumstances that impede their ability to advance their aviation plans.
  71. FedEx Express B-727 Aircraft – FedEx Express is accepting applications from qualified aviation schools/universities; airport rescue/firefighting groups; government agencies; museums and other aviation education organizations for a B-727 airplane from the company’s retiring fleet. To be considered for this donation, please submit a detailed summary of your organization, including information about your program, how the aircraft would enhance your program and any joint use opportunities with other area programs to increase the utilization of the asset.And here are some more. I could not find the website links to these, however, as much contact information I could gather, I have it posted alongside.
  72. Alpha Eta Rho Scholarship – Alpha Eta Rho, National Headquarters, 4627 Ocean Blvd., #220, San Diego, CA 92109. – Alpha Eta Rho offers five annual $500 scholarships to active members of the Alpha Eta Rho.
  73. Aviation Council of Pennsylvania – 3111 Arcadia Ave., Allentown, PA 18103.
  74. Civil Air Patrol Scholarship – CAP offers several scholarships to its members who have achieved the Billy Mitchell award, or senior rating in Level II of the training program. Amounts range from $750 to $1,500; the number of awards varies based on funding. Applications are available through squadron commanders.
  75. Eastern New England 99’s Aviation Career Scholarship – 14 Cooke Place,Warwick, RI 0288 (New England Residents only).
  76. Ernie Ayer Aviation Scholarship – Contact by e-mail: TAyer73352@aol.com, Contact by phone: (201) 447-4164. The amount of this aviation scholarship is open. The award will be made in installments following the achievement of certain goals. Two letters of recommendation and an official transcript are required.
  77. Eugene Kropf Scholarship – c/o Professor Bernard W. Wulle, Aviation Technology Department, 1 Purdue Airport Rd., West Lafayette, IN 47906-3398. A $500 scholarship is available to students in an Aviation program at any grade level, with a 3.0 GPA. E-mail: bwulle@purdue.tech.edu.
  78. Florida Spaceport Chapter – The Ninety Nines, Inc. – 2289 Cox Road, Cocoa Beach, FL 32926. This scholarship is offered to female students 18 years of age and older to provide assistance in flight training for a career in the aviation field. Must hold at least a private pilot certificate. Applications will be judged on neatness as well as sincerity of purpose and need of financial assistance. Web site: www.ninety-nines.org or http://spaceport99s.tripod.com.
  79. Joseph Frasca Excellence in Aviation Scholarship – Dr. David A. NewMyer c/o College of Applied Sciences and Arts, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901-6623; (618) 453-8898. Two $1,000 scholarships will be awarded to juniors or seniors with a 3.0 GPA. Applicants must hold FAA certifications in either aviation maintenance or flight, have membership in an aviation organization, and have financial need. E-mail: newmyer@siu.edu.
  80. General Aviation Manufacturers Association – 1400 K street NW, Suite 801, Washington, DC 20005-2485.
  81. Greater Miami Aviation Association Grover Loening Scholarship – 621 East Ridge Village Drive, Miami, FL 33157; (305) 971-9365 Several scholarships of up to $5,000 are available to students who have completed 30 credits, 15 of which must be in aviation. students must have a 3.0 g.p.a. or higher in the field of Aviation and must be U.S. citizens.
  82. Illinois Pilot Association Scholarship – IPS State Headquarters, 801 1/2 S.4th St., Apt. A, Springfield, IL 62703. IPS offers one annual $500 scholarship to a student involved in an aviation degree program.
  83. International Aviation Career Scholarship – Contact: ISA +21, PO Box 38644, Denver, CO 80238. Annual $1,200 scholarship awarded to a female pilot with a commercial license and at least 250 hours flight time and who is pursuing a career as an airline pilot. Sponsored by International Association of Women Airline Pilots.
  84. MAPA Safety Foundation – P.O. Box 46067, San Antonio, TX 78246-0607.
  85. Marion Barnick Memorial Scholarship – $1,000 scholarship to a female who holds at least a private pilot certificate and is either a member of the Ninety Nines (99’s) or a student at San Jose State, Gavilian College, Foothill College or West Valley College in California. For further scholarship information visit the Santa Clara Valley 99’s web page at http://www.pilotsguide.com/scv99s/ or call their voice mail that at (408) 327-9505.
  86. McAllister Memorial Scholarship – AOPA, 421 Aviation Way, MD, 21701. McNeil Consumer Products Company 7050 Camp Hill Road, Fort Washington, PA 19034-2299.
  87. Montana Department of Transportation Aeronautics Division, 2630 Airport Rd. P.O. Box 5178, Helena, MT 59604-5178.
  88. Mooney Aircraft Pilot’s Association – MAPA Safety Foundation Inc. PO Box 460607 San Antonio, TX 78246-0607. To receive an application, please send a self addressed envelope to address above.
  89. Nancy Horton “Touch the face of God” Scholarship – Nancy Horton Scholarship Fund, Inc., 4466 NE 91st Ave. Portland, OR 97220-5024. Scholarship offered in memory of Nancy Horton for female students 18 years of age or older training for their commercial aviation license or above. Applicants must have a 3.0 GPA, be highly recommended by her flight instructor, and have a letter of recommendation.
  90. National Air Transport Association – Lisa Copella, National Air Transport Association Foundation, 4226 King St., Alexandria, VA 22302; (703) 845-9000. NATA offers two grants each year under the Pioneer of Flight Scholarship Program. There are two scholarships for applicants pursuing careers in General Aviation as opposed to commercial airlines. Both grants are for $2,500. The academic scholarship is renewable for one year if academic excellence is maintained.
  91. National Space Club – Dr. Robert H. Goddard Scholarship – 2000 L Street NW, Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036-4907. The National Space Club sponsors a $10,000 award to a student who is a junior enrolled in an aerospace program. Must be a U.S. citizen.
  92. Ninety Nines, Inc. (99’s) – Contact Thom Griffith, Chairman, Amelia Earhart Memorial Scholarship Committee, 134 Robinhood Lane, Costa Mesa, CA 9261. The Ninety-Nines award a scholarship to female pilots. The scholarship amount depends on the recipient’s needs. For further information.
  93. Organization of Black Airline Pilots (OBAP) P.O. Box 50666 Phoenix, AZ 85076-0666.
  94. Pioneers of Flight – UAA c/o Central Missouri State University, TR Gaines #210, Mr. Steve Quick, Warrensburg, MO 64093; (660) 543-4085. Pioneers of Flight offers four scholarships up to $2,500. Applicants must be nominated. Must have a 3.0 GPA, and be a full-time student.
  95. Phi Chi Theta Foundation Scholarship for Women – Scholarship Chairman, 8656 Totempole Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45249. The foundation sponsors one to three $1,000 scholarships for full-time graduate female students pursuing a business administration degree who have completed at least one semester of study. Recipients are selected based on scholastic achievement, leadership potential, motivation, and financial need.
  96. Safe Association Scholarship – c/o Scholarship Coordinator, Embry-Riddle, 3200 Willow Creek Road, Prescott, AZ 86301-3720. A $1,000 scholarship is awarded to full-time upper-class student or graduate student with a 3.0 GPA.
  97. Soaring Society of America Youth Soaring Scholarship – CADET Scholarship, Soaring Society of America, PO Box E, Hobbs, NM 88241. $600 towards a sailplane flying lessons, and lesser prizes of textbooks and memberships. Young persons between ages 14 and 22 and not holders of any FAA pilot licenses. Application forms are available at gliderports only.
  98. Southeastern Airport Managers Association Scholarship – Two annual awards up to $1,500 for students with a B.S. degree in airport management or directly related curriculum. Contact; Southeastern Airport, Manager Association, c/o John R. Games, Treasurer, Owensboro-Daviess County Regional Airport, PO Box 1913, Owensboro, KY 42302.
  99. Student Pilot Network Scholarship – SPN is offering a single scholarship in the amount of $1000 which will go towards the flight training costs of a current or prospective flight training student enrolled in or accepted at any flight training program.
  100. Virginia Airport Operators Council Aviation Scholarship Award – VOAC Scholarship, c/o Herbert B. Armstrong, Airway Science Program, Hampton University, Hampton, VA 23688. $500 scholarship and two runners-up receive $50 towards a career in aviation. Recipients must be accepted by an accredited college.
  101. Whirly-Girls Scholarships – Whirly-Girls, P.O. Box 7446; Menlo Park, CA; 94026, 415-462-1441. Annual $4,000 scholarship to a female commercial airplane pilot to fund/obtain an initial or additional helicopter rating.

You should also check FAA website for additional information. In case I missed one or two. Plus the scholarship offerings and availability keeps on changing all the time. My advice is that you either subscribe for our newsletter, so whenever we announce something on the site you won’t miss out on time critical information.

First Black Woman Aviator in Aviation History

A role model in General Aviation Flight Training

The other day while browsing through African American Aviation History websites and blogs, I came across a name that I had heard many a times, but never got an opportunity (or simply being lazy maybe) to learn more about. So, I decided to spend some time, and read more about Elizabeth “Bessie” Coleman (Jan 26, 1892 – April 30, 1926).

Bessie Coleman happens to be the first African American (Black) Woman pilot in the history of General Aviation. She also happens to be the first American (not the first African American, or Black female, but The First American of any race or gender) to hold an international pilot’s license. Now, who would have guessed that! Not me.

Early Life

Popularly known as “Queen Bess”, she was born in Atlanta, Texas and was the tenth of thirteen children to sharecropper parents, George and Susan Coleman.

Queen Bess began school at the age of six, used to walk 4 miles a day to an all-black, one-room school. Despite sometimes lacking even basic educational amenities, Bessie was an excellent student, especially at mathematics.

In 1901, Bessie Coleman’s life took a dramatic turn: George Coleman left his family. He had become tired with the racial discrimination that existed in Texas. He returned to Oklahoma (Indian Territory as it was then called), to find better opportunities.

When she turned eighteen, Bessie Coleman took all of her savings and enrolled in the Oklahoma Colored Agricultural and Normal University (now Langston University) in Langston, Oklahoma. She just finished one term and ran out of money and was forced to return home.

Career Moves

Manicurist job in Chicago

In 1915, at twenty-three, Bessie Coleman relocated to Chicago, Illinois, with her brothers, and worked at the White Sox Barber Shop as a manicurist. This is where she started hearing the tales of pilots or aviators from who were returning home from World War I. They told her stories about flying in the war, and Bessie Coleman started to fantasize about being an aviator herself. At the barbershop, Bessie Coleman met many influential Black men, like Robert S. Abbott, founder and publisher of the Chicago Defender, and Jesse Binga, a real estate promoter. Bessie Coleman managed to receive financial backing from Binga and the Defender, which capitalized on her flamboyant personality and her beauty to promote the newspaper, and of course to promote her cause. She could not gain admission to American flight training schools because she was Black and a Woman. Even other Black U.S. aviators would not train her. Robert Abbott encouraged her to go study abroad, to France. French women were already flying at this time in history.

Flight Training in France

Bessie Coleman learned French language at the Berlitz school in Chicago, and then sailed to Paris on November 20, 1920. She learned to fly in a Nieuport Type 82 biplane, and on June 15, 1921 Coleman became not only the first African American woman to earn an international aviation license from the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale, but also the first African-American woman in the world to earn an aviation pilot’s license and the First American to earn an international pilot’s license. Determined to polish her skills, she spent the next two months taking lessons from a French ace pilot near Paris, and in September sailed back home for New York.

Airshow Performances

Bessie Coleman soon realized that in order to make a living as a civilian aviator—she would need to become a “barnstormer” stunt flier, and perform for paying audiences. But to succeed in this highly competitive arena, she would need advanced lessons and build a reputation. Returning to Chicago, she could not find anyone willing to teach her, so in February 1922, she sailed back for Europe again. This time she spent the next two months in France completing an advanced course in aviation, then left for the Netherlands to meet with Anthony Fokker, one of the world’s most distinguished aircraft designers. She also traveled to Germany, where she visited the Fokker Corporation and received additional training from one of the company’s chief pilots. She returned to the United States with the confidence and enthusiasm she needed to launch her career in exhibition airshow flying.

In September 1921, she became a media sensation when she returned to the United States. “Queen Bess,” as she was known, primarily flew Curtiss JN-4 “Jenny” biplanes and other army surplus aircraft left over from the war. In Los Angeles, California, she broke a leg and three ribs when her plane crashed on February 22, 1922. She made her first appearance in an American airshow on September 3, 1922, at an event honoring veterans of the all-black 369th American Expeditionary Force of World War I. Held at Curtiss Field on Long Island near New York City and sponsored by her friend Abbott and the Chicago Defender newspaper, the show billed Bessie Coleman as “the world’s greatest woman flyer” and featured aerial displays by eight other American ace pilots. Six weeks later she returned to Chicago to deliver a stunning demonstration of daredevil maneuvers—including figure eights, loops, and near-ground dips to a large and enthusiastic crowd at the Checkerboard Airdrome (now Chicago Midway Airport).

Fatal Plane Crash

On April 30, 1926, Bessie Coleman, at thirty-four, was in Jacksonville, Florida. She had recently purchased a plane in Dallas, Texas and had it flown to Jacksonville in preparation for an airshow. Her mechanic and publicity agent, William Wills, was flying the plane with her in the co-pilot seat. About ten minutes into the flight, the plane did not pull out of a planned nosedive; instead it accelerated into a tailspin. Coleman was thrown from the plane at 500 feet and died instantly when she hit the ground (she was not wearing her seatbelt). William Wills was unable to gain control of the plane and it plummeted to the ground. Wills died upon impact and the plane burst into flames. Although the wreckage of the plane was badly burned, it was later discovered that a wrench used to service the engine had slid into the gearbox and jammed it, causing the plane to spin out of control.

Legacy and honors

Her funeral in Jacksonville, Florida on May 2, 1926 was attended by 5,000 mourners. Many of them, including Ida B. Wells, were prominent members of Black society. Three days later, her remains arrived in Orlando, Florida, where thousands more attended a funeral at the city’s Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church. Her last journey on May 5 was to Chicago’s Pilgrim Baptist Church. An estimated 10,000 people filed past the coffin all night and all day. After funeral services, she was buried in the Lincoln Cemetery.

Over the years, recognition of Bessie Coleman’s accomplishments has grown. Her impact on aviation history, and particularly African Americans in aviation, quickly became apparent following her death. In 1927, Bessie Coleman Aero Clubs sprang up throughout the country. On Labor Day, 1931, these clubs sponsored the first all-African American Air Show, which attracted approximately 15,000 spectators. That same year, a group of African American pilots established an annual flyover of Bessie Coleman’s grave in Lincoln Cemetery in Chicago.

In 1989, First Flight Society inducted Bessie Coleman into their shrine that honors those individuals and groups that have achieved significant “firsts” in aviation’s development.

A second-floor conference room at the Federal Aviation Administration, Washington, DC, is named after her. In 1990, Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley renamed Old Mannheim Road at O’Hare International Airport “Bessie Coleman Drive.” In 1992, he proclaimed May 2 as “Bessie Coleman Day in Chicago.”

Mae Jemison, physician and former NASA astronaut, wrote in the book, Queen Bess: Daredevil Aviator (1993): “I point to Bessie Coleman and say without hesitation that here is a woman, a being, who exemplifies and serves as a model to all humanity: the very definition of strength, dignity, courage, integrity, and beauty. It looks like a good day for flying.”

In 1995, she was honored with her image on a U.S. postage stamp, and was inducted into the Women in Aviation Hall of Fame.

In November 2000, Coleman was inducted in The Texas Aviation Hall of Fame.

She is the subject of Barnstormer, a musical that debuted 20 October 2008 at the National Alliance for Musical Theater Festival in New York; the book and lyrics are by Cheryl Davis and the music is by Douglas Cohen.

In 2004, a small park in the Southside Chicago Hyde Park neighborhood was named “Bessie Coleman Park.”

Additionally, the Bessie Coleman park council was formed in 2005 as one of many responses to a serious increase in crime, shootings, and disorderly loitering in and near the park, at 54th and Drexel.

Notes
^ “Some Notable Women In Aviation History”. Women in Aviation International.
http://www.wai. org/resources/ history.cfm. Retrieved on 2008-04-10.
^ a b “Pioneer Hall of Fame”. Women in Aviation International.
http://www.wai. org/resources/ pioneers. cfm#1995. Retrieved on 2008-04-10.
^ “Texas Roots”. BessieColeman. com. Atlanta Historical Museum. 2008.
http://www.bessieco leman.com/ Other%20Pages/ texas.html. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
^ a b c d e f Rich, Doris (1993). Queen Bess: Daredevil Aviator. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press. pp. 37, 47, 57, 109-111, 145. ISBN 1560982659.
^ Powell, William J. (1934). Black Wings. Los Angeles: Ivan Deach, Jr.. OCLC 3261929.
^ Broadnax, Samuel L. (2007). Blue Skies, Black Wings: African American Pioneers of Aviation. Westport, CT: Praeger. p. 17. ISBN 0275991954.
^ “First Flight Shrine: Bessie Coleman”. First Flight Society. 2009.
http://www.firstfli ght.org/shrine/ bessie_colman. cfm. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
^ Texas Aviation Hall of Fame (14 July 2000). The Selection of Bessie Coleman for induction to the Texas Aviation Hall of Fame. Press release.
http://www.bessieco leman.com/ Other%20Pages/ release_1. html. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
^ Adam Hetrick (17 July 2008). “New Music: NAMT Announces Selections for 2008 Festival of New Musicals”. Playbill.
http://www.playbill .com/news/ article/119576. html. Retrieved on 22 January 2008.
^ “Bessie Coleman Park and Council”. Hyde Park-Kenwood Community Conference. 24 March 2007.
http://www.hydepark .org/parks/ BessieColemanPar k.htm. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.

Sean D. Tucker with Oprah Winfrey this Thursday

Sean Tucker,

well known aerobatic pilot from the bay area California is scheduled to be on Oprah Winfrey Show tomorrow. So, those of you who do not watch this show regularly (I know I don’t), tune in tomorrow and see what’s up. Or use your TIVO or something. Sean performs for Team Oracle, and is the only civilian pilot who has ever been authorized to and fly in close formation with the Thunderbirds and Blue Angels. He has received various awards in his amazing career, and honorary Blue Angel and Thunderbird are just the two examples.

Sean has trained with the legendary Amelia Reid. Here watch this video of Sean Tucker’s amazing performance. If you click on the links above for Thunderbird and Blue Angels, your can see videos of their performance as well.

UPDATE: If you missed the show, you can watch a video by clicking here. It was pretty cool to watch him with Oprah, and how he says that you become one with the airplane.

Careers in Aviation – 9 Pilot Certificates Explained

Guest Post by: Erik Johannessen

There are millions of Persons around the world, who have learned to fly. Some of them do it just for fun, others use it as a way to travel to work and there are others who become career pilots to earn a living.

If you are starting to do research on how to learn to fly, it can sometimes become an overwhelming task, but stay calm it is not as hard as it looks!!! There are 9 different types of basic certificates. In successive order of qualifications they include student, sport, recreational, private, instrument rated, commercial, certified flight instructor, airline transport pilot and designated pilot examiner. This system of certificates, together with a set of add-on ratings is used to specify the different types of flying a pilot may do.

To successfully acquire a certain certificate, a pilot must complete ground school, written examination, oral examination and flight test. The good thing is that these certificates never expire until they are surrendered, suspended or revoked. However to be able to fly the pilot is required to remain current in certain things such as to hold a valid medical certificate and to fly a certain amount of hours per year.

Let me explain to you each certificate in more detail. Note that this information is based on FAA rules. The rules imposed by the Regulatory Agencies of your country might be slightly different, however in context they are pretty much the same.

Student Pilot

This is the starting point for everyone who wants to learn to fly. It is also the point where you will know if you will like flying or not. This can happen as early as your first flight. In my case, on the first flight I felt like I was the King of the World. Student pilot privileges are very limited, however they provide enough freedom to allow you to learn all of the basics, including cross country flying and interaction with ATC.

When you are starting to learn how to fly, you complete all of your flights with a Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) on board. If you have reached the age of 16, have a valid Class III medical and have mastered the basic skills and educational topics of flight, you can make your first solo (Make a flight normally at an airport with low traffic, the location may vary from CFI to CFI, without an instructor or other certified pilots at the controls).

As a student pilot you are allowed to operate only near to your “home-base” and with a sign-off by your CFI you can travel to other local airports to practice your cross country skills. You may only fly in good weather during the day and night. You may think “I have a CFI on board and if weather gets worse he can fly back”. In general terms that is true, but it would be a waste of your money, since those hours do not count towards your certificate. I personally do not recommend it, but hey, it is your money. As a student pilot you are not allowed to carry passengers or fly for hire. Flying on busy Class B airspaces is usually not permitted without a special permission from your CFI.

Sport Pilot

Sport pilots fly in aircraft that fly at low speeds – less than 100 mph. The sport pilot certificate created new medical standards for pilots. These pilots usually do not require Medical Certificates. The only proof they need is to have a current valid driver’s license.

To get this certificate you must be at least 17 years old and have a minimum of 20 hours of flight time. This includes 15 hours of flight training and 5 hours of solo flight.

As a Sport pilot you may fly cross-country; however, you cannot operate at airports or airspaces that require ATC communication unless you receive the proper training and endorsements from a CFI. You are also not allowed to fly after dark and with more than one passenger on board.

Every 24 months the pilot is required to revalidate their certificate by undertaking a flight review with a CFI.

Recreational Pilots

Recreational pilots are primarily people who learn to fly for fun, with little interest in becoming professional pilots or using airplanes as a practical means of traveling from place to place. Recreational pilots must be at least 17 years old and have a minimum of 30 hours of flight time (the real-world average is more than 40 hours), including a minimum of 15 hours of flight instruction.

Recreational pilots may not fly more than 50 nautical miles (about 58 miles) from an airport at which they have received instruction, unless they receive appropriate cross-country training and a special instructor’s endorsement. Recreational pilots may not carry more than one passenger at a time, and they may not fly for hire or at night. They are not permitted to operate an aircraft on any charity flights, nor in connection with a business or their employment. They may fly only single-engine airplanes that have fixed landing gear, no more than four seats, and an engine of no more than 180 hp. They may not fly in airspace where communication with air traffic control (ATC) is required unless they receive the appropriate training and have a special endorsement from a certificated flight instructor (CFI).

As a result of these restrictions, the vast majority of people studying for their recreational pilot certificate continue to earn their private pilot certificate. Because of this, there usually are only about 300 pilots with the recreational certificate each year.

Recreational pilots must have a current Class III medical, which they must renew every 24 or 36 months (depending upon age). They must revalidate their pilot certificates every 24 months by undertaking a flight review with a CFI.

Private Pilots

Private pilots comprise the largest group of pilots and are among the most active flyers. In 2003, there were 241,045 private pilots. To become a private pilot, one must be at least 17 years old and have a minimum of 40 hours of flight time (the actual average is about 70 hours), including 20 hours of instruction and 10 hours of solo. Pilots trained according to accelerated curricula defined in Part 141 of the Federal Aviation Regulations may be certified with a minimum of 35 hours of flight time.

A private pilot — with appropriate training, ratings, and endorsements (e.g., floatplane, tail dragger, multiengine, helicopter, jet, retractable gear, pressurized, high-performance, complex, etc.) — may carry passengers in any aircraft, day or night, good or bad weather (see Instrument Rating below).

Private pilots may not fly for compensation or hire (no passenger or revenue services) but may share equally with their passengers the direct operating expenses of a flight — specifically fuel, oil, airport parking and landing fees, and aircraft rental charges.

Private pilots must have a current Class III medical, which they must renew every 24 or 36 months (depending upon age). They must revalidate their pilot certificates every 24 months by undertaking a flight review with a certificated flight instructor (CFI).

Instrument Rating

While technically not a pilot certificate, the instrument rating is the most common and logical step to take after gaining some experience while flying with a private pilot certificate. This add-on rating allows a pilot to fly in weather with reduced visibilities such as rain, low clouds, or heavy haze. When flying in these conditions, pilots follow instrument flight rules (IFR). The instrument rating provides the skills needed to complete flights without visual reference to the ground, except for the takeoff and landing phases. All pilots who fly above 18,000 feet mean sea level (msl) must have an instrument rating.

The instrument rating makes the use of aircraft more practical for routine transportation because most of the time, an “IFR-rated” pilot will be able to safely conduct their flight in spite of the weather conditions they may encounter.

The instrument rating requires highly specialized training by a certificated flight instructor (CFI) with a special instrument instruction rating (CFII), and completion of an additional written exam, oral exam, and flight test. Pilots applying for an instrument rating must hold at least a current private pilot certificate and medical, have logged at least 50 hours of cross-country flight time as pilot in command, and have at least 40 hours of actual or simulated instrument time including at least 15 hours of instrument flight training and instrument training on cross-country flight procedures.

If not used on a regular and sufficient basis, pilots must revalidate their instrument rating every 12 months by undertaking an instrument proficiency check with a CFI.

Commercial Pilots

As the name implies, commercial pilots can be paid to fly aircraft. Commercial pilots must be at least 18 years old and have a minimum of 250 hours of flight time (190 hours under the accelerated curriculum defined in Part 141 of the Federal Aviation Regulations), including 100 hours in powered aircraft, 50 hours in airplanes, and 100 hours as pilot in command (of which 50 hours must be cross-country flight time). They must hold an instrument rating, or be restricted to flying for hire only in daylight, under visual flight rules (VFR), within 50 miles of the originating airport. They may fly for hire in accordance with applicable parts of the Federal Aviation Regulations.

Certified Flight Instructor

A certificated flight instructor (CFI) is authorized by the Federal Aviation Administration to give instruction to student pilots and pilots taking recurrent training or preparing for additional certificates or ratings. They also may give flight reviews and recommend their students for flight tests. CFIs must be at least 18 years old and must hold at least a commercial pilot certificate and instrument rating. CFIs may earn a special instrument instructor rating, allowing them to teach instrument flying (operating an aircraft in the air solely by instrument indications without visual reference to the ground). An instructor with this rating is called a CFII.

In addition to undertaking their normal flight review every 24 months, CFIs must revalidate their instructor certification every 24 months. There were 87,816 flight instructors in 2003.

Airline Transport Pilots

This is the doctorate degree of piloting — and 143,504 pilots were in this distinguished category in 2003. Airline transport pilots (ATPs) must be at least 23 years old and have a minimum of 1,500 hours of flight time, including 500 hours of cross-country flight time, 100 hours of night flying, and 75 hours in actual or simulated instrument flight conditions. Most ATPs have many thousands of hours of flight time. ATPs also must have a commercial certificate and an instrument rating. ATPs may instruct other pilots in air transportation service in aircraft in which the ATP is rated. They may not instruct pilots outside of air transportation service unless they also have an appropriate fight instructor certificate.

ATPs must have a current and much more stringent Class I medical, which they are required to renew every six months. Like all pilots, they must revalidate their certificates every 24 months with a flight review. However, most active ATPs undergo a check ride in an aircraft or simulator every six months.

Designated Examiner

If the airline transport pilot is the doctorate degree of piloting, then becoming a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) designated pilot examiner (DPE) is the equivalent of mastering advanced post-doctoral work. These individuals are few and far between. They’re almost like judges in that they have to be appointed by the regional FAA Flight Standards District Office (FSDO). Before one can become a DPE, he or she usually has to wait for one of the current DPEs in that region of the United States to retire. As the name implies, these people have been designated by the FAA to test or examine the performance of their fellow pilots. DPEs typically have decades of real-world experience and perform the majority of official FAA check rides or flight tests for everyone from new pilots to seasoned airline captains.

About the Author: visit vikingo.com.gt for more information on me and a lot of aviation contents Article Source: ArticlesBase.comCareer in Aviation – 9 Pilot Certificates Explained

Alcohol and Aviation

I was reading an article about when do you have to report a DUI or DWI related action (in a motor vehicle) to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)? You can read it here. It is true that any arrest, and/or conviction has to be reported to the FAA within 60 days, as required by FAR 61.15 . Some pilots have a misunderstanding that they only need to report the conviction and not the arrest, and, the others think that they have to report only when they go back for their Pilot Medical Certificate renewal. Both these are far from the truth.

Another thing we need to understand is that honesty here is always the best policy. FAA does occasionally check the National Driver Register against pilot, mechanic and other FAA certificate holder names. And if you have failed to report your incident within the applicable time frame, which is 60 days, and FAA comes across your name during it’s driver record search, you will definitely have something much bigger to worry about.

It is common for the FAA to not take any action against the offending pilot on the first instance of a driving DUI/DWI. Subsequent ones, I don’t know. I have not come across such a  pilot or a mechanic yet! If someone out there knows of such a dare-devil, please drop me a comment there with a contact information so I can enhance my knowledge from his/her experiences.

8 hours bottle to throttle is the minimum, as per FAR 91.17 .  That’s right, no matter how small the sip, you stay away from that ramp until at least 8 hours has elapsed. And that’s not all. 04% alcohol concentration in the blood or breath is enough to get you in trouble with the FAA as well. Perhaps it takes less that that .04% concentration for you to be affected. Or have you considered how badly you’re likely to perform while hung over? Quite a few studies have documented the loss of performance, judgment, and reaction time you can anticipate even after your blood alcohol content has dropped back down to acceptable levels.

So, remember, alcohol and aviation, for that matter just about anything physical, ;-), yes that too, is not a good combination and should be avoided at all times. Alcohol is to be consumed and enjoyed very responsibly.

Oh by the way, the ol’ pilot rule of the thumb to remember this (in case you are a forgetful person) is called Whiskey Compass rule. We’ll talk about it some other day.

Sport Pilot

DEFINITION OF A LIGHT SPORT AIRCRAFT

14 CFR PART 1.1

Light-sport aircraft means an aircraft, other than a helicopter or powered-lift that, since its original certification, has continued to meet the following: 
(1) A maximum takeoff weight of not more than– (i) 1,320 pounds (600 kilograms) for aircraft not intended for operation on water; or (ii) 1,430 pounds (650 kilograms) for an aircraft intended for operation on water.
(2) A maximum airspeed in level flight with maximum continuous power (VH) of not more than 120 knots CAS under standard atmospheric conditions at sea level.
(3) A maximum never-exceed speed (VNE) of not more than 120 knots CAS for a glider.
(4) A maximum stalling speed or minimum steady flight speed without the use of lift-enhancing devices (VS1) of not more than 45 knots CAS at the aircraft’s maximum certificated takeoff weight and most critical center of gravity.

(5) A maximum seating capacity of no more than two persons, including the pilot.
(6) A single, reciprocating engine, if powered.
(7) A fixed or ground-adjustable propeller if a powered aircraft other than a powered glider.

(8) A fixed or auto-feathering propeller system if a powered glider.
(9) A fixed-pitch, semi-rigid, teetering, two-blade rotor system, if a gyroplane.
(10) A non-pressurized cabin, if equipped with a cabin.
(11) Fixed landing gear, except for an aircraft intended for operation on water or a glider.
(12) Fixed or retractable landing gear, or a hull, for an aircraft intended for operation on water.
(13) Fixed or retractable landing gear for a glider.

MEDICAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SPORT PILOT

(14 CFR part 61.23/53/303)

A Medical or U.S. Driver’s License (Other than Balloon or Glider)

A Student Pilot Seeking Sport Pilot Privileges in a Light-Sport Aircraft
A Pilot Exercising the Privileges of a Sport Pilot Certificate
A Flight Instructor Acting as PIC of a Light-Sport Aircraft

A Person Using a Current and Valid U.S. Driver’s License Must

Comply With Each Restriction and Limitation Imposed on Your Drivers License
Comply With Any Judicial or Administrative Order Applying to the Operation of a Motor Vehicle
Not Have Been Denied Your Most Recent Application for a Medical Certificate (If You Have Applied for Medical Certificate)
Not Have Your Most Recently Issued Medical Certificate Suspended or Revoked (If You Have Been Issued a Medical Certificate)
Not Had Your Most Recent Authorization for a Special Issuance of a Medical Certificate Withdrawn (A Special Issuance Is Not a Denial)

A Person Using a Valid Medical or Current and Valid U.S. Driver’s License Must

Not know or have reason to know of any medical condition that would make that person unable to operate a Light-Sport Aircraft in a safe manner.

If You Are a Flight Instructor and You Want to Train Sport Pilots and SP CFIs:

1. Hold a Current and Valid CFI (Valid Pilot Certificate, Meet Currency, Hold Appropriate Endorsements)
2. Appropriate Category and Class Ratings in LSA (5 hours PIC make and model within a “set” Additional Category and Class Privileges Endorsed in Logbook)

3. U.S Drivers License or FAA Medical (If acting as PIC)
4. Comply with all Sport Pilot CFI Privileges and Limits
5. Exercise CFI Privileges

How to Become a Sport Pilot

1. Meet Medical and Eligibility
2. Pass a FAA Sport Pilot Knowledge Test
3. Receive flight instruction in an appropriate aircraft.
4. Pass a FAA Sport Pilot Practical Test
5. Sport Pilot Certificate Issued (All Category and Class Privileges Endorsed in Logbook)

If you are a FAA Certificated Pilot and Want to Exercise Sport Pilot Privileges:

1. Hold at Least a Recreational Pilot Certificate (X-C Training if a Rec Pilot 61.101(c))
2. Hold Category and Class Ratings for the LSA Flying (Additional Category and Class Privileges Endorsed in Logbook)
3. U.S Drivers License or FAA Medical
4. Current Flight Review
5. 3 Takeoffs and Landings within 90 days (if carrying a passenger)
6. Operate only FAA Certificated LSA
7. Comply with all Sport Pilot Privileges and Limits
8. Exercise Sport Pilot Privileges